Accessibility

Transcript for January 2016

>> Here's one of our hearty starters [laughter].

>> It's wonderful to see such a great turnout and especially so many of our alumni and our current students here. As I talk to a number of individual people of individual people thinking about going into the program, I mention the importance of this event to really hear firsthand from our current students from our alumni about what are they doing with this degree, why had they entered this program. This is really an excellent way to learn about the idea of applying to this program. My name is Chuck [inaudible]. I coordinate the program. I'm one of the faculty members. We're going to be doing a lot of things tonight, and a lot of really getting to know who you are as prospective students in our program. You're going to have a chance to hear, again, to hear from faculty, staff, current students, and alumni. We very much want this to be an interactive type of thing. We want you to ask questions. We want you to basically ask anything that you're thinking about. This is very much an open forum. I do want to say that this is being recorded. It will be there forever, so keep that in mind. We record this and we also are broadcasting this live because -- for people that are unable to make it here tonight. What we're going to do is we're going to start with our promotional video. This is something we created last year to really give a face to relocation counseling, because sometimes when you talk to people about this field you say -- they ask, "What is relocation counseling?" One of the common things that people say is, "Drug and alcohol counseling." That might be a component of it but it's a much broader field than that. The video is to kind of give a perspective, give a picture to what this field's about. Then we'll just go from there. All right?

 

back to top

 

>> A Master of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and our --

>> Thank you for taking a few minutes to check out our Master of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and our various options. Even though rehabilitation counseling has been around as a career since the 1950s --

>> Yeah [inaudible].

>> -- not everyone knows what rehabilitation counselors do.

>> You probably want to see it, so [inaudible].

>> It's coming [inaudible].

>> For those of you guys joined us online, you're not able to see this unfortunately, but if you go to the RCP website, the homepage, there will be a link where you can view it at any time.

>> Thank you.

 

back to top

 

>> [Inaudible] I'm sorry, Daniel.

>> Thank you for taking a few minutes to check out our Master of Science of Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and our various options. Even though rehabilitation counseling has been around as a career since the 1950s, not everyone knows what rehabilitation counselors do. Counselors partner with individuals with disabilities to help them make informed choices, build valuable careers, live independently in the community, and pursue meaningful lives. The primary focus of career [inaudible] and rehabilitation is developing [inaudible] skills, acquiring knowledge of disabilities, and demonstrating respect and sensitivity for people with disabilities. Knowledge and practice of these principles, combined with a solid foundation of specialized education in a rehabilitation field enables dedicated rehabilitation professionals to help individuals with disabilities achieve their goals. Individuals supported by rehabilitation counselors included Wounded Warriors from Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere, teenagers with disabilities transitioning from school to adult life, and persons who experience physical or sensory disabilities through injury and illness, whether they were born with a disability or acquired them later in life. [Inaudible] program to complete the Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Degree [inaudible] on campus and distance options. The degree is 60 semester units and typically takes two-and-half to three years to complete. Students learn to create, deliver, and evaluate rehabilitation training programs and services. Upon graduation, a rehabilitation counselor is qualified to work in a wide variety of settings. The outlook for employment in rehabilitation counseling is excellent. Our graduates typically find employment as counselors, evaluators, assistant technology specialists, in a variety of settings including governmental agencies, community programs, and other nonprofit or private agencies. Our program is distinguished by how we respond to the needs of local, state, and international communities. We often engage with our community partners to develop curriculum, create [inaudible] assignments, advocate for needed services and programs, and present a real-life perspective to the work of rehabilitation counseling. Here are some testimonials about the Rehabilitation Counseling Masters Degree at San Diego State University from current students, alumni, and employers.

 

back to top

 

>> This has been tremendous. They've been supportive. Most importantly in this field they've been like family.

>> Just from the start I felt very welcome from the faculty and staff as well as students. I got a lot of guidance from the students, especially some of the second year students --

>> [Inaudible] that the program always took time out to make sure that we learned a lot about veterans and [inaudible] within each class. Your experience [inaudible].

>> Well, you are [inaudible] graduates come through this program, I mean, and I can't tell you, as an alumni of this program, how proud I am to work with those students that come through here just -- they're [inaudible] fine students that come through the program.

>> Faculty as counselor I think this program to me is a [inaudible] not just that we have [inaudible] but the whole institution.

>> We encourage you to explore the rest of our [inaudible] to learn more about our program. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah. So hopefully that gives you a little feel for what this profession's about. I think one of the things perhaps you can [inaudible] take from this video is to show that this is a field where you do make a difference. That's a kind of a phrase a lot of people use as a throwaway line for different kinds of jobs, different kinds of activities. But it really -- I think it's a very true statement in this field. I think among our current students will attest to this that every day is going to be different. You're going to be dealing with people that are looking at the new possibilities that making their career options at -- looking at new directions. As a rehabilitation counselor you have an ability to really make both kinds of incredible changes for that individual. The work is never boring.

 

back to top

 

The work is always, I think, very meaningful. There are a lot of opportunities in this field. The fact is that our society is growing in the number of people with disabilities due to things like the ageing of the population, the fact that we have a lot of veterans coming back with service-connected disabilities. We think about post-secondary settings such as community colleges. We have many more students than in past years participating in post-secondary classes and different programs, certificates, and so on. That's creating a need to have relocation counselors to support students in those settings. Again, I know we have a number of alumni who are working in the system and they will be able to talk about what they're doing in that area. So a very exciting area.

 

back to top

 

A lot of growth, a lot of things that are happening. One of the things we're going to ask you -- you may not have been expecting to do this, so early in this presentation, in this meeting -- but we're going to ask you to say a bit about yourselves, and if you do get into this program, one of the things you will get used to, or hopefully get used to and enjoy, is that you'll be doing a lot of talking in the classes. One of the factors behind that -- the classes are very small. Classes might be as small as five students. The biggest ones may be 20 to 25 students. You can't like sit in the back of a 500-student classroom and not say anything because we're going to know if you're there and we're going to call on you. Yeah. It's not like intimidate you but it's more of a -- to say that this is going to be a very interactive kind of environment. You're going to be able to voice your opinions.

 

back to top

 

You're going to be able to talk about what you think is important in this field. You're going to be able to ask questions. It's going to be a very dynamic and very interactive kind of setting. We'll start that tonight. I just have a couple of simple questions here. One is, what is your name? When I say name, what is your kind of name that you like, not your official name, but your nickname, how people commonly refer to you. And if you're thinking about the on-campus or distance program. Now, for fall of 2016 we're only looking at the on-campus program, but we will be doing improvement for the distance program possibly in a year to two years from now. But if you're thinking about distance, this is a good time to say that, that that's an interest that you may have. The other question will be -- you came here tonight for a reason, so what are those reasons? What do you want to learn about the relocation counseling program? Maybe you have questions about the relocation counseling profession. Whatever it is, just let us know so we can make sure that, as the faculty, we address whatever questions that you want to have addressed tonight. So, Cindy, because I know you're -- we just talked a few days ago. I'm going to pick on you. Again, your name and what do you want to learn about -- what do you want to learn tonight, for example.

 

back to top

 

>> Okay. My name is Cindy. People often just call me Cynthia, but it's really Cindy. I guess I'm interested in the on-campus but -- and I don't know that's the online would be [inaudible] if you want San Diego. But anyways.

>> Yeah. Typically, it's only for people outside the San Diego area.

>> Right. I'm interested on-campus and -- yeah. I'm interested in researching [inaudible] school would be that -- find also -- take it out [inaudible]. I'd like to work with veterans basically. So what I'd like to learn today is hopefully learn that the [inaudible] for people who worked in the field, whatever is that you can relate. I'd love to learn what your, I guess, [inaudible] what a day-to-day day would be, and the way that you interact with people.

 

back to top

 

>> Great.

>> I [inaudible] a lot of [inaudible].

>> One plus one.

>> Yeah [laughter]. I have -- I was about all this [inaudible].

>> We'll welcome. Glad you can [inaudible] because your life will be impacted as well [laughter].

>> I'm a veteran so you just feel [inaudible].

>> I'm not going to ask the alumni and current students to introduce yourselves yet, but we will get to that later. Perspective students. Who else is out there? Yeah, Greg.

>> [Inaudible] yeah, my name is Greg. I hope to do this on-campus program. I learned about the program through my father [inaudible] and my hope is to have a [inaudible] -- I'd like to work with veterans as well. I do a lot of -- I'm tied into the music scene in San Diego so I play in a lot of dance and I used to go [inaudible] like that, so it's [inaudible] in the family. I would just like to [inaudible] hope so. Eventually getting [inaudible].

>> Yeah, so the thing I talked about before. Working with veterans is one of the biggest areas of focus that our students have in the program. There's a number of programs that work with homeless veterans that our students are working in, and actually have created programs in that area. We have students who work at the VA, so -- we have a number of students in the program who are veterans themselves, pretty recent discharge from the military, so definitely you can pursue that.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah.

>> Yeah? Other perspective students out there. Yeah.

>> All right. So I'm [inaudible].

>> Hey [inaudible].

>> We've been on the set for quite a while and glad [inaudible].

>> Yeah, likewise.

>> I'm a veteran as well. I didn't realize if I check in with Disability Services a couple of -- about a year ago, and I met [inaudible]. After she got through breaking out all of my [inaudible] problems because sometimes what you see on the outside is not really what's going on inside. You came to kind of a conclusion that I [inaudible] because I-- basically, they take out of vocational rehabilitation programs because I was told that the only way I could get a job is never [inaudible], and so I came to the conclusion that maybe it was because I didn't have an education, so I'm a senior at SDSU. Never went to school. Never finished school and all that [inaudible]. I'm interested in the program because I want to learn how to help people that have been told no, and that there's not another avenue, that you can't contribute to society, and that you don't function properly. I could just keep going on and on, and so that's why I'm here. I want to become familiar and I want to learn. I found an interest and I guess it was just meant for me to meet [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah, that's great. Yeah. I'm glad you articulated, I think, some of the other -- the idea of perhaps certain people don't have potential. One of the things we believe in this field is that everyone can contribute something. Everyone has strengths. Everyone has things that they can do. We firmly believe that. I think that's one of the things that makes this profession unique among other helping professions. I'm not sure if every other helping profession really has that at its core, is that regardless of the background a person we're going to look at. What does this person want to do? Then build on what they can do, build on their strengths, build on their interests rather than focusing on weaknesses, pathology, which happens a lot. So definitely we'll talk a lot about that. Other? Yeah? Hi.

 

back to top

 

>> I'm Lydia Tyler. I was referred to the program by Russ [inaudible] a gentleman. We took a class together. I'm looking to change professions and I [inaudible] because I know you have [inaudible] here. Since I'm looking to change professions and I noticed that my [inaudible] has been where [inaudible] people. I want to explore a little more about the [inaudible] program, what it actually entails. I'm looking more into the online program because I do [inaudible] but I'm open to both.

>> Yeah. Great. I'm glad you have a contact with Russ. He is a great person to talk to about this program.

>> Yeah. He told me, yeah, I hear you want to go back to school, so he told me hang on. I think you ought to know about this [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah. Yeah, one of the things that we're going to talk about tonight -- we'll focus really on the on-campus program that -- let's say if you had an equal choice between the distance versus on-campus. We'll talk about a number of the features of the on-campus program that aren't part of the distance program. In the on-campus program there's various specializations where you have the potential to look at licensure, preparing for counselor licensure in California. There's things you can do -- again, you can do in the on-campus that you can't do in the distance. I think this is a good option for individuals who live very far from a Masters Program like ours, and they really don't have the option to attend. I think tonight will be helpful to kind of look at the features of on-campus versus distance in terms of making that choice. Okay? Who else do we have? Yeah.

>> Hi. I am Tracy, and I'm actually thinking of --

>> Yes.

 

back to top

 

>> -- [inaudible], too, by Chris Long. I know Brandi and Crystal come to [inaudible] brain injuries program, and I'm part of the program because I sustained a brain injury when I was in college [inaudible] and [inaudible] as a -- not diagnosed, and [inaudible] veterans to know because there's temporary things that your [inaudible]. I had a lot of difficulty and it wasn't until your [inaudible] hearing that the [inaudible] brain injury programs that I received. It helps you realize that there is a way that I can get better and more [inaudible]. I want to be able to help people that have dealt with a lot of psychological stuff. They play a part, a big role in that community. So I just want to be able to help people find the resources and get to help [inaudible] in order to get better [inaudible].

>> Yeah. Yeah. I'm glad you have a contact with Chris Long. The [inaudible] program is -- it's an incredible program and -- we talked about my focus is brain injury and I really don't know of a program like this anywhere else in the United States. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

>> He's going to be in it as long as he needs. There's another program in L.A., but the two -- I think L.A., [inaudible]. It's a year program which is [inaudible] because it's not like you just get better right away, so [inaudible] program and I'd want to help in that area somewhere [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah, right. Thank you. Who else do we have? Yeah.

>> Hi. My name is SueLynn [assumed spelling]. I'm interested in the on-campus option. I currently work in Special Education. I work with a student who has a hearing loss and other specific disabilities going on. I really thought I was going to go this whole sign language [inaudible], and ever since working in Special Education kind of solving my interests in other things, so I kind of just check out various -- what else could I do with my career path to [inaudible] my knowledge and work with many different kinds of professionals in this population. So I plan to stay and in spite of the fact --

 

back to top

 

>> That's great. Yeah. I mean Special Ed -- there's a lot of connections with [inaudible] counseling especially with some recent federal legislation that has more of a focus on working with youth with disabilities, and within the program we have a number of different options to get that kind of experience, so, again, there will be a lot of opportunities if that's an area that you're interested in looking at. So, great. In the back we have somebody? Yeah?

>> My name is Bunny [inaudible] and I'm very interested in this program and I spoke with a lot of people that have gone through this program, so I'm [inaudible] that kind of [inaudible] then as an [inaudible] and currently I work with [inaudible] who has [inaudible], so I'm very interested in [inaudible]. I want to gain more [inaudible] and more understanding to help people. I definitely [inaudible] that I'd like to [inaudible].

>> Yeah. Yeah. You'll have a lot of counseling background in the program. Hopefully it won't like scare you off or scare other students off, but we have a class in which you have to videotape yourself doing a counseling session with a client, and then you show it in a room like this, and everyone gets to see your [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> [Inaudible] 10 people in [inaudible].

>> Yeah, yeah, yeah, right. There's only 10 people in the class, yeah. It won't be like 30 or 40, but -- great. You get a lot of background in terms of how you develop rapport, how you use different counseling techniques, different approaches. You definitely will have a lot of focus, and if you have an interest in your career growing you'll work in job development and job placement. It's definitely an opportunity to get more experience and more background in that area as well. Ready?

>> My name is Ivy. I'm interested in the campus program. I currently work for DOR and I'm kind of an employee and I think the services that we offer consumers is amazing. Our doctors at our office speak highly of this program and I'm [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> That's great. What office are you in?

>> I'm in the same office [inaudible].

>> All right, great.

>> I work with Robert [inaudible] --

>> Yes, great [laughter]. Yeah.

[ Inaudible Conversations ]

The program has -- we have a very strong DOR connection. Historically the field's really been based on working with agencies like DOR or other state vocational rehabilitation agencies. A lot of the folks in the program will really prepare you if you wanted to stay within the DOR type of system. [Inaudible] and I were just there the other day and it was like a reunion going into the office because so many of the people throughout all the DOR offices all throughout San Diego County have gone through our program, so definitely have that strong connection. [Inaudible] people here. Yeah.

>> I'm Claudia. I live in Monterey but I'm in interested in [inaudible] seeing a part of your on-campus program. I have the physical disability of I'm just [screaming] and --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

 

back to top

 

A lot of that for you in my area and I noticed that a lot of people go -- there's like [inaudible] being very successful. They kind of -- they backed out because they're afraid that this is what it is. [Inaudible] something like that because I -- I don't know. I think through my advocacy work and [inaudible] this program I really have a passion for taking [inaudible] afraid of taking that next step [inaudible] and then showing them that [inaudible] and that [inaudible] not like [inaudible] license. I think that it's important for me to see that people are independent and then there is a life [inaudible] there's not living in the [inaudible] of somebody else but living in the [inaudible] of themselves and doing exactly what they want to do, so, yeah.

>> Yeah. One of the concepts we talk a lot about in this field philosophically is self-determination. So that when a core affect showed that we [inaudible] this rehabilitation counselor, so, [inaudible], we will definitely have that perspective in the program and thank you for making the trip all the way from Monterey.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah

>> So.

>> I love San Diego. I lived in San Diego for 10 years, so it's like home. [Inaudible] come back again.

>> Well, they're -- you're a guest. Yeah.

>> Hi. I'm --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

At this point I'm mostly leaning towards people with developmental --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

It's validated all the confidence that I've ever had going to [inaudible] basically not --

 

back to top

 

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

Does that make sense?

>> Mm-hmm.

>> I want to help others that might just need that little extra push and I just -- basically, I just want to help people [inaudible]. But [inaudible] it's like there's one thing to be [inaudible].

>> Yeah.

>> But, yeah. That is [inaudible] the diversity of course work in [inaudible].

>> Yeah. We'll talk about that tonight. We'll talk about the fact the entire [inaudible] is six units. It typically takes two-and-a-half to three years to complete. As you know, I've talked about there's different specializations within the program including cognitive disabilities that [inaudible] that you have an interest in. So definitely you could pursue that. Okay? Other guests here? Yeah.

 

back to top

 

>> Hi. I'm Debbie --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

And I recently --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

One of the things I really, really loved when I was in the Navy was talking [inaudible]. What do you want to be, where do you want to go, and how can I get you there?

>> Yeah.

>> What programs were there that helped us with [inaudible]. The answer's [inaudible] conversations with your peers and --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

-- look at this program [inaudible] are interested in some of the other programs I was supposed to be in. [Inaudible].

>> Yeah. Yeah. You mentioned the Navy. We've got a strong Navy connection in this program. We just had somebody who graduated. Thirty years in the Navy. He retired as a Chief. Then the previous year, the outstanding graduate for the program was also a -- he is a 20-year Navy veteran. Obviously being here in San Diego we see a lot of Navy students, a lot of Navy veterans, a lot of Marine veterans come through the program. So, yeah, hopefully tonight we'll be something you're looking for in terms of a program. Other individuals. Yeah.

>> My name is [inaudible] and I'm also -- you know me from among the [inaudible]. So I keep pushing, sorry. But I was referred to this program by Paul Stevens --

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah.

>> -- who is a student here, and three other friends that are in here also [inaudible] in the program. I've been working in the Alcohol [inaudible] for about 15 years. As you were talking about cognitive skills, I also want to learn that. I think that would be a [inaudible] in Spanish, and I have a lot of [inaudible] that I work with, and there's that [inaudible] of me not knowing more to help them out because sometimes they do have that literal disability that are not around, but I'm losing [inaudible], so that's my passion, and I'm sticking to my story. I know that I'd be [laughter] -- I'm good at this.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah. Not [inaudible] at all. What I would reinforce with everyone here tonight. Call as many times as you need to because we're here to support [inaudible] everyone thinking about the program. One of the reasons I mentioned that is I think in the -- it's like a theme that's also within the program. Now, if you become a student, that it's a very close-knit community. Sometimes we use the word like family to describe the program. One of the benefits of the program is that we take around 23/25 students per year, so we get to know everyone. You get to know everyone. You develop friendships and relationships that, in some cases, will last your entire career. So, definitely, we'll talk about that tonight. Anyone else? Yeah, yeah.

>> Okay. I'm Brenda. I've been working in the community services [inaudible] for many years. But I work with DOR extensively [inaudible] in San Diego helping people with disabilities find work, so I pretty much work for most, if not all, of the [inaudible] counselors in San Diego. [Inaudible] like how do you do that?

>> Yeah [laughter].

>> Where I like to be [inaudible]. So that's why I'm here, to find out what this is.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah. Like I said, the DOR focus is a very strong component of this program, and DOR and all the state's vocational rehab agencies throughout the United States are going to be hiring. We've got a lot of people that are retiring from that system, so if that's an interest you definitely can pursue that. I think one of the things [inaudible] that may interest you is that sometimes students will come in saying that I know for sure this is the type of agency, this is the type of population I want to work with. Then they take a class, they have an experience, something happens where they had to take 180 degree change, especially they had never anticipated. That may happen as well. But I think the bottom line is there's a lot of possibilities within this professional group. Yeah, yeah.

>> [Inaudible] I work with [inaudible] San Diego. That's a [inaudible].

>> Okay. Did we get everyone? Did everyone have a chance to speak? All right. At this point we're going to shift the session to our faculty and after that then I'll ask our current students and alumni to say -- their experiences within the program. What they're doing with this degree. We're going to start with our Chair of our Department, Dr. Karen Sachs, a faculty member in the [inaudible] counseling program as well.

 

back to top

 

>> I [inaudible], welcome, and welcome to our [inaudible] so great to see everybody. I think just the fact that you [inaudible] how many [inaudible] to our [inaudible] program and just graduated from the program. The fact that they're here to welcome you, I think says a lot about our program, and the fact that most of you have been recruited by people who are already in this program or have graduated from the program. That really attests to the idea of how connected we are in this community locally, but also statewide, nationally, internationally. We just had two students who are -- one already left and the other one's leaving this weekend to go do internships with the state this semester [inaudible]. You've got to give -- getting connected in the field is what we're really all about. That's how we get your internships, that's how we get your employment, that's how things happen. We have [inaudible] pretty small overall, and we -- I think in a way I think Chuck mentioned that the whole idea of getting people [inaudible] of seeing the positive, and you've heard these same stories, many of the stories that you just shared with us that we've heard over and over and over again about people thought I couldn't do it, and then I didn't believe it in myself that I could do it.

 

back to top

 

Our program -- I mean, we've talked that talk, and that's how we operate when we got people into the program. We would give people the benefit of the doubt. If you come in and your GPA isn't the greatest or you haven't done your best work on DRE, so that's -- people get really freaked out about that. Those aren't really things that you're going to see out of this program. If there's any way that we can [inaudible] people -- if we feel like it's a good match and you feel like it's a good match, we're going to give you the benefit of the doubt to come in and show us what you can do. Then if it doesn't work -- we both tried, right? But we would rather give people an opportunity to show us how you can have [inaudible] and [inaudible]. Show us what people [inaudible] and we'll help you get the rest of the way. So that's what we do and that's how our program I think has been as successful as it is and how we've been around for over 40 years.

 

back to top

 

A lot of people say they don't know about the field of rehabilitation counseling . This program is over 40 years old and probably it has a thousand graduates [inaudible] and they're everywhere. They still contact us. I just started helping somebody who graduated in 1992 who is asking for some of these courses. We got an e-mail this week from another student who graduated about 15 years ago who -- oh, I'm thinking about licensure. Can you help me with some information? I mean, people never go [inaudible]. We love it. We love it because then you're helping with [inaudible]. As far as my background, I'm -- I don't have any special educator so I [laughter] started out in the transition area. Did a lot of work with the [inaudible] and so we do -- that's one of our specializations, that we do have a certificate in the transition [inaudible]. I also run a certificate in specialization in the technology area, and there are people who carry that technology certificate and do that with our College of Engineering. So those are a couple of the specializations that we offer. We also just [inaudible] work on a few things that have --

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah, Annia [assumed spelling].

>> -- that this isn't just a random building that we picked. We actually run an institute that takes care of the [inaudible]. This is all of our grants and contracts, all the funding that we get from outside the University, so they could be grants from the Department of Education, and we get some from different corporations. We get -- we just finished a project with the [inaudible] Foundation. [Inaudible] professional ed programs. We get a lot of different [inaudible] funding and so that all comes through the University Research Foundation. It comes into the Institute. So we run lots and lots of different programs which provide students with opportunities. It also provides students with [inaudible] which I'm sure Chuck will talk about even more. That helps with funding for our students, but it also provides opportunities for graduate assistantship, other kinds of work on projects, and it's certainly a part -- many of our folks here have talked about different opportunities that they've had in working with our grants. It's all there for the asking. We do it, not because grants are looking for more work to do, but we do it because it provides an amazing number of opportunities for students to pursue their interests and build their skills. [Inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Take care. Marge.

>> Hi. I'm Dr. Marge Olney. I coordinate the [inaudible] rehabilitation track, I guess you'd call it, which includes a path to licensure, to the LPCP. So many of you probably are familiar with the LPCP. It's the new licensure law in the state of California. It came into law in 2011. So not that new anymore. But we have an avenue for people who want to work specifically in mental health to get licensing in -- to provide [inaudible] for the logical counseling. That's a possibility through this program. My son has a [inaudible]. I ended up being the person who kind of guides that whole process, and that's new. We have a new [inaudible] leading to the LPCP and it's something that you would apply for separately.

 

back to top

 

So if you think that you'd ultimately like to work in mental health within the county system, where you need a license in order to do that, that would be an avenue that you could take. So I'll just kind of make that available to you. If you're interested in knowing more about licensure and what you can do with it, and what it takes to get there, and it takes a lot to get there, I'd be glad to address that. Feel free to e-mail me. What I do besides the [inaudible] components, is I teach a bunch of the required courses. One of them is the Foundations in the Rehab Process which is the first class that you take when you come in. Well, actually, you take the practicum, you take Medical Aspects os Disability, and you take Foundations. I teach that class. In that class we focus on what rehabilitation counseling is, sort of the background things about how to be a rehab counseling professional. It's our ethics in practice in the field. But also we focus on how to write an APA-style paper. So that would be -- it will be the introduction to what -- that would be the introduction to the program. My graduates are laughing over here.

 

back to top

 

>> Oh, we're just --

>> And [inaudible]. Don't forget --

>> Oh [inaudible].

>> You just post it. That's true. They are posted. I also teach [Inaudible] Theory in the program, and that takes you from [inaudible] and the rest of the dead white men all the way to [inaudible]. It looks so [inaudible] in terms of counseling methods now. Ir provides [inaudible] historical view of [Inaudible] Theory, really focusing on all the major ones that have come along over the years. In addition to that I teach two courses in Psychiatric Rehabilitation, so if you're interested specifically in working with people with psychiatric disabilities, taking those courses makes a lot of sense. If you're interested in just maybe taking some information about psychiatric disabilities, you can take one of those courses as an elective. So that's a possibility for you, too. I'm trying to think what else. Oh, in terms of the rest of what I do --

>> Job placement course.

 

back to top

 

>> Oh, job placement. I teach the job placement course and I'm really dedicated to that course. I'm glad to hear you say that you really liked to do job placement, and that you're really interested in that because I am, too. I think once you have a passion for that kind of work, that's what you want to do. One of the nice things about your job placement counsel is we're able to work with people and get them to a point in life where maybe they're not even dependent on benefits anymore. Maybe they can move on with their lives, so rather than just providing counseling services we can actually provide something possible where someone can change their lives dramatically. That course comes usually at the end of your program, and it's an opportunity to gain the skills around how to provide that service to somebody. So those are the things that I do in the program. In addition to that, I have research that I do that I'm very interested in. I focused my career, in terms of research, on looking at disincentives to employment, so specifically looking at benefits and disincentives to employment. I've done research over the last 15/20 years on that topic.

 

back to top

 

More recently I've been looking at [inaudible] strategy to really help people stay employed. So to understand that same area of employment. I'm very interested in seeing what it takes for people to be successful on the job. My recent paper, one I wrote, it's recently become accepted for publication, focuses on a technique called the [inaudible] action plan, specifically for people with psychiatric disabilities, and how that plan, how knowing how to use those techniques impacts a person's ability to stay gainfully employed and happily employed. Those are the kinds of things I do. You probably are aware that the faculty members, they teach you, so there's the teaching and advising roles. But in addition to that our faculty is responsible for governing our own departments, and the University is [inaudible] and also doing research. So you probably think well, somebody's only teaching three classes. What are they doing the rest of the time? Believe me, we're busy.

>> Yeah.

>> That's what we know about me. Thank you.

>> Okay.

 

back to top

 

>> Okay. It's my turn. I know you've been standing here for long enough [inaudible] about [inaudible] so I will be short and sweet. I'm [inaudible]. I'm a faculty member [inaudible]. Like my colleagues mentioned about, I've been teaching. I do research. I'm also serving on different committees. So if you do not see me n the classroom I'm somewhere, I'm meeting with someone [laughter], or playing with the [inaudible] trying to accompany my research responsibility. In terms of the courses I teach, Marjorie mentioned about the three courses that as new students you're going to be taking in your first semester. One is Foundation Course that Margie teaches. The other one's Medical Aspects, that Mark teaches. I teach the [Inaudible] Practicum which is the course that Chuck mentioned, and you're going to do two more [inaudible] take another course, and -- but the good part is you will only have no more than 10 students in that class. So some of you here, sitting on the back who already in our program have taken the course with me. I hope you could say that's a fun course [laughter], right? [Inaudible] you played a rock [inaudible], you played a [inaudible], then you'll be able to say that to each other. To me, that's a fun course.

 

back to top

 

Another course I teach -- by the way, another course actually teaches you [inaudible] skills in terms of how to make sense of people and how to ask questions and how to provide a feedback, even what you thought you heard. When you are in school. So it's really things [inaudible] when you'll be needing the skills. Probably learn from a course. You'll be very valuable [inaudible] your role to become a counselor. Another course I teach, it's a counseling course. You might [inaudible] most [inaudible] counseling. In another course we learn how cultures influence your [inaudible]. Many of those former students, alumni, they have taken that course, and it's an [inaudible] course to me and sometimes it's a challenging course to me and to my students because another course we will be discussing some -- -- what would be the good word to describe? Well, we challenge in situations related to racial relationships, related to discrimination against government, against LGBT, against people with disabilities.

 

back to top

 

So sometimes it's not so fun to talk about, but to me that's the process what we needed to go through in order to become a better person and a better counselor because we have to work with people from different cultures, especially San Diego. Our society, our communities are so diverse, so I hope you will enjoy that course. Some other courses [inaudible]. That's another fun course to me and in this course you will learn [inaudible] country techniques and skills and you'll actually [inaudible] goals in another class. So other courses I teach, [Inaudible]. Beyond the courses that I teach, I also do research. So my [inaudible] will be the [inaudible] compared to Marge. Marge's focus is on the employment issue. [Inaudible] more to psychosocial adjustments [inaudible]. I look at the cultural influences on creative advancement, on [inaudible] patients with a disability. I'm also conducting research with our former students, actually going through my [inaudible] taken here. Currently we are revising a manuscript. Hopefully it will be published someday, huh? That's all.

 

back to top

 

>> Okay. All right. Thanks. Mark.

>> All right. I'm going to stand up and just get on camera over here. But I haven't been like looking at the computer, ignoring everybody the whole time. We've got some folks who are dialing in by distance and I need to [inaudible] essentially [inaudible] speak up, so I haven't been deliberately ignoring you. But I'm Mark Tucker. I'm faculty in the program. I'm also a graduate of the program from a number of years ago so I've got some -- I can kind of see, hopefully, the program from a couple of different perspectives, having taken a lot of the classes, not with so many of the same instructors, but with different instructors a while back. The classes that I teach in the program are -- there's a two-semester sequence in Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disabilities. Most folks take it during their first year. A couple of people wait until the second year, but you should take it during your first year. It's actually held up a [inaudible] rotation in a working rehab facility which gives us access to a lot of experts that we've had come in and share their expertise because they know a lot more about some of the conditions than I do. It's kind of nice to hear from some different folks every now and then, too.

 

back to top

 

So that's I think one of the few classes that we have that's not offered either up on campus on down here, using our classes here. Then I also teach a Research Methods course that some folks -- not everybody, but some folks kind of come in feeling a little bit anxious about -- most folks survive this very well, so, yeah [laughter]. Don't put that one off until the very end. You'll need it for some of your other courses. Then above and beyond that I tend to work on a number of grants and contracts that we have, operated out of [inaudible]. That's something that I just sort of encourage you, as you come into the program. Just find out -- it can be easy the first day up on campus and not -- you kind of pay attention to what's going on down here, but you can learn a little bit or sign on down here. There's usually some interesting opportunities so that's just something I would encourage you to do. Sort of actively seek out what's going on at Interwork. Research-wise, you're kind of hearing a little bit about the research interests of the different faculty. I've got interest in kind of the two primary areas. One is looking at sort of the role of post-secondary education or post-secondary training on leveling the playing field for people with disabilities.

 

back to top

 

So, does it make a difference, to what extent does it make a difference, or who does it make a difference, what kinds of services and supports help people to be successful in those kinds of endeavors that do help just sort of level the playing field? So that's one area. Another area is needs assessment, looking at what are the needs of folks with disabilities, particularly as it pertains to employment. Then we do that from a variety of perspectives. We get the perspectives of folks with disabilities themselves, the perspectives of [inaudible] rehab professionals, the perspectives of employers and the businesses that will be hiring the workforce. That actually, that area brings us into contact with a lot of agencies, [inaudible] where we have agencies where we've actually helped them to use that information for strategic planning. That's also given us the opportunity to collaborate with a bunch of agencies, establish relationships with a bunch of agencies, and even drag some students along with us to kind of some interesting places like Washington, D.C., and American Samoa, and this semester, Guam, to kind of learn about what are the needs, and believe me, the difference in the needs and American Samoa are quite different than, say, what the needs would be here, or the needs would be in say, Virginia, or something like that.

 

back to top

 

>> Nevada [inaudible].

>> Yeah, Nevada. That's an interesting place, too, and they're our neighbor.

>> Right.

>> Yeah. If you're interested, catch me after the orientation, and then I can share a little bit with you about what's going on at Interwork or catch any of us at any other time and we'll be happy to tell you what's going on.

>> Sarah.

>> My name is Sarah [inaudible] and I work with Marge in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Certificate, and I -- this year will be teaching the seminar for psych rehab and also the online series class, right?

>> Yeah [laughter].

>> I'm on to some of this [laughter].

 

back to top

 

>> I am a graduate of this program and I became interested in this program because I also live with a disability. I live with meno schizoaffective disorder bipolar type, and so it's a combination of schizophrenia and bipolar, and I am -- my research interests focus primarily on two things -- ECP and recovery from [inaudible] related to ECP, and also peer support specialist. Just a plug for the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Certificate. One in four people with some kind of mental illness at some point in their life, and so it's likely that all of your clients easily either themselves or a family member of them, someone that they're living with, a loved one, will be affected by mental illness, so it's something that you will encounter on a daily basis. For that reason we always invite you to take our seminar classes, and even if you take it one step further just so that you can better understand. There's so many aspects of disability to be dealt with and a lot of those aspects are overlapping, and so we just want to be -- also encourage you to prepare for that. That's about it.

 

back to top

 

>> Sarah. John, are you out there?

>> I want to thank you [inaudible].

>> Yeah.

>> He's up there.

>> Sneak in through --

[ Laughter ]

>> I am John [inaudible]. I am a graduate of the program, 2003. It seems like forever ago. But this is a wonderful program. I co-teach one class with Dr. Sax in Assistive Technology so I have a long background with Caren working on different assistive technology projects, mainly to help individuals, adults, with developmental and other disabilities, find jobs through using a device that helps them complete the job tests. My background is more in going to Home Depot, getting some cardboard and duct tape and putting something together that's pretty inexpensive and cheap. They do that. So it's been a wonderful experience co-teaching with Caren a number of -- what? Eight or nine years I think now. This experience in this program -- one of the things I like to point out when I have the opportunity to talk about it is that because of the courses you engage in in teaching this program, and one of those, or two of those is organizational development and grant writing, is that you can take that experience -- and out of this program you gain the confidence to be a change agent in your communities, whether you work with DOR or you work with the regional center, you work with other companies or organizations.

 

back to top

 

You can go back with that experience you get from this program and really help your organization change and take it up a notch in terms of services or change things they're doing to make it more applicable to the current trends and legislation and changes. We have a lot of things on the horizon legislatively in terms of the employment for people with disabilities, so graduates of this program, like Sarah and the others who are working at our community colleges, are not forcing the colleges to add things and new classes, other opportunities for people with disabilities. I can guarantee you that when you go into this program and you come out the other side, you're going to be a changed individual, and you will have a lot of confidence to go back out and engage in the community in a lot of different ways outside of just filling the job description, so.

 

back to top

 

>> Thanks, John.

>> Mm-hmm.

>> Myself, I focus mostly on -- in terms of my teaching I'm the area of assessment. So we talk about things like neuropsychological assessment. So if somebody has a brain injury or some kind of neurological injury, how to you assess functioning after that happens? Because we're in the field of relocation counseling we take about it more in a functional type of sense, like how's this going to relate to the person's ability to work or to live independently? I also teach assessments in terms of vocational assessment, so things like if you're working with somebody and they're not really sure what they want to do for a career or for a job, what are the different kinds of assessments to look at, what their abilities are, what their interests are, what do they value about work, and then try to really create planning around what that assessment information indicates. I also teach career development, so different theories of career development. There's a whole -- the students who are taking my class can -- you probably recognize words like super and Krumwaltz [assumed spelling], and Harlem, and all these theorists who have these different ideas about how somebody approaches the idea of a career because it's a very complex set of processes that people go through to reach that point of whatever we call career development. In terms of -- and we'll get in --

 

back to top

 

[ Laughter ]

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

It's third now, right?

>> Third?

>> Third? Third, yeah.

>> It's actually [inaudible], yeah, yeah.

>> Yeah.

>> Thank you because it's the third [inaudible]. Actually than the movement of the -- developing the brand and see -- so we've got a logo up and running and it will be [inaudible] with somebody to go there and presenting [inaudible] and all that stuff, so it's great fun to get involved in the [inaudible], the program, because you can kind of [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah, thanks. I'm just going to kind of throw this out to our current students. Whoever wants to kind of speak up next.

>> If I could just add something. Your microphone's not picking up really well, so if you speak up, speak up with a little volume. That would be great.

>> Yeah, Nick.

>> Hi, everyone. I'm Nick. I'm [inaudible] new student in the program. I'm part of the cognitive disability specialization. It's good to see everyone. I've got a new [inaudible]. I'd like to meet some [inaudible] it looks like, so, cool. My experience here has been awesome so far. I come to that decision I made in terms of continuing my future work as [inaudible] rehabilitation professional as long as I get through this program [laughter]. I'm positive that I will, because I make use of the support and resources that available. So that's -- our faculty have all been there for me as mentors I would say.

 

back to top

 

You get assigned an advisor, but they're all like mentors I would say in many different ways, and I've been blessed in that way. I've also been blessed [inaudible] students in the feedback that I get and learning from them and talk with them [inaudible]. Like Chuck mentioned at the beginning, there's always dialog going on in the classes. It's not really like lectures that most of -- these days. You're [inaudible] conversation and in a sense the topics been -- and forcing you to get out of your comfort zone a little bit. You just embrace what it used to do [inaudible] profession and I love it, and I've learned a lot from them, my classmates. In terms of work experience, there's a lot of opportunities out there. Many different skills to practice. I started off as -- in my first semester moving from Long Beach. I didn't really know what to do. When you get accepted into the program you'll find out that there's going to be a lot of job announcements coming your way --

 

back to top

 

[ Laughter ]

>> After this --

>> That's what I thought, too. I mean [inaudible]. You guys are just getting them all the time. [Inaudible] to see class as future relocation counselors. I started off working at the Community College. I loved doing that. That's what I -- it was like they were really gung-ho about when I started, and I was kind of advised to try something new and broaden my practice and worked for the Department of Rehabilitation. Both of these opportunities I kind of got through our faculty. First of all, they're providing us with a job [inaudible] going as far as recommending you for the position, and it's more than developing your counseling skills. The Department of Rehabilitation will teach you that, absolutely. You're going to wear a lot of different hats there. I work with veterans. I work with people with psychiatric disabilities, cognitive disabilities. I haven't really gone into the [inaudible] all different [inaudible] people, and you will definitely get the practice you're looking for, at least with that sort of agency. The skills that you're going to acquire transfer to all sorts of different skills [inaudible] in the field. Also, remember, the [inaudible] case of [inaudible]. If you're interested in joining like a student body that's new, fresh, looking to take people on and mentor them, we have this process so that they're not lost and they have someone else that can guide them through it. [Inaudible] will do that and you want to bring other people up to do that as well. Lots of other opportunities for workshops to attend in addition to what you learn in class as well that will really facilitate what you're learning, so --

 

back to top

 

>> You organized one yourself?

>> Sure.

>> Yeah, we have. There was a workshop -- there's lots of grant opportunities that are available in this program to practice writing grants and I was given the opportunity to do that. You're all give the opportunity to do it, actually. It's just whether you want to or not. I was mentored along the process. I'd never written a grant before, and we obtained funding to put together a workshop focusing on [inaudible] funding. It's a pretty hot topic in job development. Really -- and a kind of a new way of looking at things. It makes a lot of sense and I think it's going to hit the ground running in two years, I hope [inaudible]. I'm really excited for that and there's lots of other workshops that are out there, so I'm [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Who else? Who'd like to go next? Yeah, Bert.

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

>> I'm in my second year in [inaudible]. I got into this program by accident. I accidently get in this field searching [inaudible] and started to volunteer [inaudible] for a nonprofit. I was willing to -- for another one. Met Chuck on the board. We spoke. As it turns out I [inaudible] a support group [inaudible] which is where my background came from, and I ended up working with students within the program. So I'm with Chuck who [inaudible] students now. I looked into it long before coming [inaudible]. It has been very interesting for me because I do have the background of working in the field, but I didn't have the history of what a rehab counselor does. I also can do the future as a rehab counselor. So I started with [inaudible] to get degree for the DOR and that -- it doesn't work that way. It does not work that way. When you're in the program, you're going to be -- like when I took that -- a lot of options. So keep your minds open because there will be opportunity and like Nicholas said, this is the best decision I've made. I [inaudible] and I wish I would have done it sooner. But, anyway, I'm here in front of you now, and I'm in the program. Welcome. I see it's a lot of students here [laughter].

 

back to top

 

>> Yo.

>> Correct?

>> [Inaudible] my name is Kumar. I'm the secretary of the [inaudible]. I'm in my second year as [inaudible]. My [inaudible]. I don't know. My background is really like off in left field where I kind of come out of [inaudible] arts, so I have like a pretty [inaudible] strange --

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

I also have [inaudible] which is not much [inaudible]. But I'm [inaudible] -- as I go on to [inaudible] one application for it is especially for [inaudible] cognitive specialization. And as [inaudible] as I am, I'm actually -- I got through last semester which I was surprised [inaudible], and I think that wherever you're coming from is whatever approach. I think our program provides a lot of creative space within to explore your minds and explore the concepts and [inaudible] get free and see what the idea for rehabilitation is about. Like I said earlier, emphasizing that people have to [inaudible] of our field of our industry in that there is most of these societies making sure that anyone whatever their disability is essentially is [inaudible] you could change and everyone pretty much has -- everyone could come up with the guidance sometime in their lifetime whether they take the time to look at it [inaudible] and that's [inaudible] process. It's the importance of [inaudible] that essentially will not --

 

back to top

 

[ Inaudible Speaker ]

>> Yeah. Crystal.

>> I'd rather be an undergrad student.

>> We have a couple. We're [inaudible]. I'm not going to call them but -- but maybe last call [laughter], last call for current students.

>> What if they want to [inaudible].

>> They're [inaudible]. All right. Well, this -- let's transition now to alumni and, again, what kinds of things [inaudible] degree, maybe what drew you to this program, to this profession. I think, again, what are you doing now in your careers? I think anything you think is important for our prospective students to know. We will have a little bit of time for the prospective students to ask questions of the current students and alumni. I want to make sure you have that chance to dialog a bit. So, Crystal, since you had raised your hand, I'm going to start with you [laughter].

 

back to top

 

>> Can't you using Susan here. [Inaudible] I'm Crystal. I graduated '13/'14? [Inaudible]. So pretty recent. Initially when I was applying for grad school I -- well, I chose this program because I have family members who have [inaudible] disabilities, Down syndrome, mental illness. So I figured that this would be a good route just because growing up I saw that they had challenges that they were facing that there weren't any programs that were supporting them in kind of what they wanted like going to school or getting integrated into the community, finding and keeping employment, things like that. So I decided that I didn't want others to kind of go through these same challenges. So [inaudible] did it. I was excited [inaudible] anybody what the opportunities were and you know, I worked continuously across the district. I do a few things there [inaudible] and a couple of other things that was like -- I don't work college just to do things [inaudible]. I may remind them that this --

>> Prudence speaking in [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> But you know what? I noticed things that are, you know, vary in means or [inaudible] stuff for students so I just remind them daily that these are things that will strengthen them. And so I find them receiving it. But I think when you are going through the program and you really have the opportunity to explore different avenues, okay, there are a couple of things [inaudible] across the district like [inaudible] having experience with the VA but it seems really ultimately, you know, having those experiences and people are very [inaudible] they did. The [inaudible] certificate, I did the psych rehab certificate, really got to narrow it down and identify what it was that I really saw myself doing long term. So it was great to have the support of you know, all the faculty but also students and alumni who were referring me to places, recommending me for different things and I really was able to get involved with a lot of them in the community. You know, the regional center and DOR [inaudible] agency [inaudible] provided me a lot of opportunities to stick towards your interest to really find out what your niche is and what you want to do with that. Interestingly, you know, [inaudible] statements together --

 

back to top

 

[ Laughter ]

Again, there was [inaudible] because you go through classes, you have to be familiar with each other then you work together and you just have that connection in any way you [inaudible].

>> Okay, could you -- do you still have the time to teach?

>> I teach the application [inaudible] course, yeah.

>> Okay, I thought you were joining [inaudible] on the phone. Was that you?

>> Yes [laughter].

>> You made a [inaudible] that the program here, would that work at the transition here?

>> Yes.

>> Yeah?

>> Yeah, I know that these [laughter] -- here we go, you wanted to hear my voice and [inaudible].

>> Sure, if I could just interject first. Because [inaudible] won next year alumni --

[ Multiple Speakers ]

 

back to top

 

Community colleges that [inaudible] in the regional center here I attend numerous transition [inaudible] for transitioning views who are [inaudible] about to leave public schools and going into adult services for secondary ed. And several times, when I walk around the room where all the tables are set up and all the representatives are there, almost every single community college district representative is an alumni from -- So that's how, you know, far reaching we are as [inaudible]. Outside of this program actually, it's the big community of our graduates and the one thing I didn't say, if I could, when you send out your resume as you graduate from this program, [inaudible] Master's in [Inaudible] Counseling, that does -- has a significant impact on the people who receive your resume. Not only in California or San Diego but other rehabilitation state agencies throughout the nation because we're the top nine, 10 all the time. When they see that, it's either because, you know, they recognize the legitimacy of the value of the program and the reputation also because you're probably being read by one of our alumni [laughter]. It's a great way to reach out and get into jobs whether it's in California or any of the states.

 

back to top

 

>> It's a [inaudible] fortunate and so there'll be some times when we maybe we don't mention our, you know, we'll flip our [inaudible] part of it. It's a significant achievement like we're -- and when we look at according to the right [inaudible], the ones that are [inaudible] are the ones that have doctoral programs in rehabilitation counseling. So it does have, I think, a national type of job for our application, you know, with applying for job and the nationwide doctoral program if you have an interest in applying for doctoral programs. Your program has a very strong academic reputation and it carries a lot of weight when you apply for any kind of doctoral program around the United States. Michaela?

 

back to top

 

>> Before entering this program, I didn't have a lot of experience working with people with disabilities [inaudible] fields. So once I got into the program, with all the opportunities the professors provided, I was able to expose myself to a number of different agency programs out there. For example, I worked with Karen on different grants. As [Inaudible] said, I was a graduate assistant with her and we're -- even though I'm an alumni, I'm still working with [inaudible] at college so that's an opportunity that students will have within the program. I've worked with Mark on a needs assessment so I traveled to Washington, DC and [inaudible] to look at their locational rehabilitation programs. There are a lot of opportunities here within the program. If I don't know what you want to do, you can fix your [inaudible] all the professors here and they're very supportive of what you want to do, where you want to go, and they [inaudible]. Currently, I work at the visibility support program with [inaudible] that we used in college. I also work on an extended opportunity program [inaudible]. So we're both working with students who participate in [inaudible] secondary education. Also, I work on the grant [inaudible]. I was the entering graduate assistant position and now just kind of developing different tools that you use for making transitions for [inaudible] so keep it simple and --

 

back to top

 

[ Laughter ]

>> Okay.

>> Hi, I'm [Inaudible]. I work on [inaudible] program. I have -- I actually have several of my members who have different disabilities. And so I always work around people with disabilities and I noticed that a lot of the time the people out in the community didn't necessarily have the same view that I had, not as accepting. And so I initially started looking up this program for that reason. I wanted to spread awareness. I wanted to help people with disabilities in any way that I could. And also learn more about my family members and they're disabilities and how I can help them as well. So I graduated in December of 2014 with a psychiatric specialization. And now I work for [inaudible] Community College District. I work for the entire [inaudible] program as their counselor. And I also work at Southwestern counseling and I teach a couple of the personal development courses for people with disabilities. So it's been a wonderful opportunity and I don't think that I would be as successful as I am today without this program.

 

back to top

 

I have learned so much, way more than I ever thought I would. I saw a lot of amazing relationships. And by the way, so the people that said, "Oh, I'm sorry for sending so many emails trust me." I don't know why I sent a lot of emails. And so it's always good to send emails and you get answers to your questions. You definitely have a lot of support so even if like, you don't know us since we're not going to be in the program in your classes but you will get to know us out in the community and you're always more than welcome to talk to any of us. There's always one to talk to you guys and answer questions. So hopefully you ask them.

 

back to top

 

>> There's one example of what [Inaudible] is saying is that when you're in the program, you have a number of classes where you get applied experience in the field and so our alumni's here could be your supervisors at your place and such. And you know, it's a chance to network as we've said a number of times tonight to get [inaudible], to get guidance, you know, to really know how to do this job. So we have -- we work with alumni who again, you're probably going to interact with them in some capacity within the program. Okay.

 

back to top

 

>> I'm [Inaudible]. I am -- I got pretty exposed also. I did [inaudible] retired from the Navy and retired from the Navy and came into this program after retiring. And I -- it's my, you know, acquired disability that kind of got me into this program. It has been pretty amazing these past few months. Remember you said about work experience is still true in just internships and work during the program, I did the VA. I've been on DOR and then I took part in the [inaudible] certificate and I worked at -- in [inaudible]. So three very different kind of diverse experiences just as an intern and I suppose I was in one of them that actually turns into the job so that was well, the same as [Inaudible]. I did get away from Southwestern College and met these guys. They were [inaudible] and then also I [inaudible]. And I was diagnosed there as the rehab counseling degree qualifies you for general counseling in the community colleges but a regular counseling degree doesn't get you a [inaudible]. You still have a little, you know, a little more versatility and you're exposed to a little more options and as I've seen here, they're also pretty excited about it. I graduated in December. I mean, in May -- May or December, I was a little slower.

>> You're not going to [inaudible].

>> Yeah, exactly. About the family thing, with the RCSA and stuff, is really neat too. And I even tell stories about Sarah teaching us how to do -- and this is about three to four years ago, teaching us how to do the PowerPoint and make [inaudible], and not to --

 

back to top

 

>> [Inaudible] PowerPoint [laughter].

>> And then I teach Dr. [Inaudible] grad school 101 paper, you know, on how to write [inaudible] so it is a tight-knit group and a family that I can [inaudible] out there. I had signed up for them. I get emails from the DOR website like California State [inaudible] counselors, you know, hiring rehab counselors around the state. Their website rotates between 35 and 45 openings throughout [inaudible] so maybe they're not all in San Diego but other people, graduates of ours have left San Diego and gotten jobs in the DOR, you know, throughout the state. So I mean, that's a lot of jobs, I mean, 35 to 40 continuous, not just like a flash. It's rotating always.

 

back to top

 

/

>> And every state has their own DOR.

>> Yeah.

>> And they're looking for people too.

>> And then the program has a [inaudible] jobs coming out and it's always been Texas, a lot of Texas, even some Nevada every now and then. Idaho, I think, I've seen it a time or two so there's always jobs out there.

>> Absolutely, that's true.

>> The rest of the state --

>> Yeah, lots of opportunities, diverse opportunities, [inaudible]. You know, each professor, I think, had you know, one of favorite classroom professor [laughter]. I always had a good time. And one thing I will say and it seems like a lot. Three years, about two-and-a-half if you're smart, take it one class at a time, one paper at a time, you just plug away, plug away, plug away, just do it and the next thing you know, you're at the end.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah.

>> So just, you know, just keep plugging away and get that paper done and then get to another and you move on. It'll happen.

>> I think if you have one thing to ask about is that, it's not really, really fast but you're not doing it alone. I think a lot of people come in and are absolutely terrified like [inaudible] papers or just tests and that kind of thing but you know, everyone is going to be supportive whether they're in second year or third year, you know. No one's going to let you do it alone so [inaudible].

>> I think also something [inaudible], the professor didn't have [inaudible]. It's important to understand that you are among friends and so I know many students who come in, some of them will go with the [inaudible] but they do have [inaudible] responsibilities or they have some kind of adaptive situation where they're still kind of looking, trying to figure out how things work out for them.

 

back to top

 

And oftentimes, you keep going into a graduate program, you're thinking, "Oh my word, I'm going into a graduate program. What am I doing to myself?" The nice thing is that all the faculty members have extensive experience in good locations. And so you will be able to brainstorm with the .faculty and with other students about ways that you can create compensatory skills and adapt to the [inaudible]. And so it's very important especially with your faculty members to be up front and honest with them. You know, if you're having difficulty retaining information, if you're having difficulty with memory issues, if you're having difficulty getting your books in an alternate format, it's very important to have your faculty members understand your situation.

 

back to top

 

They can work with you through [inaudible] or help you to do something that will help you in the long run. I came in here six months after the school board [inaudible] injury. I had no memory and so Mark and Chuck, I'm sure, can attest to the fact. They were trying [inaudible] and they'd call me and then I'm like, "Why are they calling me [inaudible]?" And it was really interesting because the people who've been through what I've been through, they were saying, "How did you do it?" And a couple of them [inaudible]. How did you do it? Oh, I had really excellent faculty. This guy [inaudible] called me I learned how to adapt my own learning style to [inaudible] and it was primarily because I had faculty members who were very well-versed in understanding and working with people with a variety of needs and abilities.

 

back to top

 

>> Ruby?

>> Sure, hi. I'm Ruby [Inaudible] and I am [inaudible] Department of Rehabilitation. I'm been working partner for the [inaudible]. I actually found [inaudible] email. And so you will find out through those emails. There's like even a ton of them. So my job started out as a pilot program and it has become an official program and with that, we started out as nine and now we're 31 and then hopefully, will be another -- we'll some more additions after the state budget is signed. So this program has been great. I've had so many work [inaudible] within this program and not by the program. But -- yeah, so I started the program one to [inaudible] disability and it's an invisible disability but I also wanted to give back. I'm willing to work in the [inaudible] but then I discovered this job and it's a great job. Then as part of rehabilitation, I have a lot of wonderful friends and family because of this group. So yeah.

 

back to top

 

>> All right, thank you.

>> Yeah, I say just do it [laughter].

>> It's a great program. You guys can't lose. I mean, I get to still work with Karen and everyone on different, you know, [inaudible] the transition program or what they do call it now? Well, they changed their name. It was [inaudible].

>> Yeah, it was [inaudible]. I know, I don't know what they call it now.

>> State Council [inaudible].

>> They just changed their name.

>> Yeah, I noticed.

 

back to top

 

>> But there's this program that Jamie experienced here [inaudible] conferences.

>> Was that with speakers?

>> Yeah, they had speakers. So I've learned many things I never thought I would ever do, conferences, sitting in classes and stuff like that. And then, yeah, it's wonderful. It's a great group to be a part of.

>> Okay, it's that people don't -- we don't really let people leave even faculty who retire still work with them.

>> Yup.

>> So we have several retired faculty who are still working with us on grant projects. Our academic coordinator for our department is retiring in December. We're hiring her back at the institute a couple of days a week [inaudible].

>> She's been here 37 years.

 

back to top

 

>> So it's just a pretty amazing culture that's been built over the last 40-some years. I do want to mention that they're going to be talking about these different specializations. Please know that you don't have to have a specialization. You're more than welcome to take the program as it is and plug in a couple of new courses like Marge said, you know, plugging in a course on [inaudible] rehab, plug in [inaudible] course regarding problems with disability. So wherever you go, I mean, unless you work in an agency that only works with people with that specific disability, you know, who's to say that you're going to stay there for the rest of your life? And so you will have, you know, exposure and some of the knowledge and experiences, the [inaudible], the resources and the questions to ask about various communities and various individuals who present [inaudible]. So you know, you don't have to think it's expensive because [inaudible]. If you take specialization, you could also, in some cases, you can like when you're in the program and then decide. So you know, that's not something you have to do up front unless you want to go the [inaudible] track.

 

back to top

 

And I don't think Marge mentioned that you can do the sites we have, specialization and not do [inaudible]. So those are two things that can be separated as well if you're working in the Department of Rehab, for example, you don't do licensure to work with people with mental health issues or [inaudible]. You don't licensure for that. So you know, be sure and talk to us about it if you have ideas that you know, going to licensure is as one says, it's a big deal. That if you want more experience and skills around working with people with mental health issues, you are going to show up in every one of these environments that we've talked about, take a course review, you know, or do the specialization but you don't necessarily need the licensure. So you know, just so you know you've got lots of options because I think sometimes people walk away from here and we hear this over and over. "Oh my God, I don't what specialization to take." You don't have to take one. I just wanted to kind of emphasize that so you don't feel that pressure. And you could figure it out [inaudible] too.

 

back to top

 

>> Sometimes the [inaudible] themselves will steer you to something.

>> Yeah, great. So with the current students and our alumni, you know, I don't want to keep you here that much longer but if you want to have --

>> You're beating it.

>> Yeah, but I do want to open up --

>> You're doing okay [inaudible] --

>> For a prospective student, if you have any questions you want to ask of a preferred student and alumni, this is the time to ask. So we'll kind of open up the room for that, any questions you might have.

>> I do [inaudible].

>> Yeah.

>> To any of the graduates or alumni that work with veterans [inaudible], what your specific [inaudible]? I've got all kinds, I guess, going around in my head and I'm hoping [inaudible] will do that [inaudible] but I'm kind of struggling with that, to actually let me go in and [inaudible].

>> My [inaudible] program and services out there. There are a lot of veterans just coming in with their [inaudible] so I help determine what accommodations they come in just in the [inaudible]. So it's kind of like [inaudible].

 

back to top

 

>> Okay.

>> [Inaudible] how long it would take.

>> We have alumni [inaudible] who's also part-time faculty [inaudible] somewhere with the veterans, working directly with veterans and sometimes our graduates work in clinical settings and also in the [inaudible]. So we have [inaudible].

>> Yeah.

>> David [Inaudible] is coming here.

>> Yeah.

>> We can [inaudible].

>> Actually, I went there and I was talking to Spence.

>> Yeah.

>> Yeah.

>> The possibility of [inaudible]. He said, I think he said like 85% of [inaudible] work at the VA are veterans. So I mean, he was, I could tell from the [inaudible] that really, he was like, he actually [inaudible]. He was back on it like, "No, I need like [inaudible]." You know, he's not a [inaudible] but -- and that's fine, you know. You know, I heard there's a lot of opportunities out here but yeah.

>> [Inaudible] run for the [inaudible] at the VA where [inaudible]. She will come in [inaudible] and she will say sometimes people who aren't veterans do really well and she's kind of the [inaudible]. So you know, you're right, the majority are clearly veterans that they've had some really good people [inaudible] or not.

>> I'm kind of --

>> Got hired and she's not a vet and she's took that part [inaudible].

>> So here's also [inaudible] from the veteran [inaudible] office.

>> But they [inaudible].

>> Yeah, the [inaudible] like you just can't -- you know, I work at [inaudible] and it's kind of the same thing. We [inaudible] have clients and the VA is going through VSPS for the community aspect of fund raising. I got really lucky. I suppose that like [inaudible], I mean, general counseling is a [inaudible] myth like we're new veterans or old veterans or [inaudible], they have -- they put me out there and another guy who's been doing it for a lot longer, counseling and making it easier for the veterans. So there's two counselors [inaudible] partner. It's like before they walk in, you can just walk in. They don't have to talk in front of the [inaudible]. And so I do that. I've seen a lot of veterans just in general counseling.

>> Great, that's good.

 

back to top

 

>> That's been the thing [inaudible] so okay.

>> Great, thanks.

>> Every single campus [inaudible] patients has a disability service [inaudible] and a lot of the campuses have the veteran hospital. So I work with them for like alliance community partnership like the Veteran's Office and I wanted to address the person who took advantage of the GI Joe [inaudible].

>> Any other questions?

>> Yeah, everything [inaudible] is reassuring.

>> Yup.

>> Don't be shy [laughter].

>> Well, if nothing -- you know, maybe it's not really short to ask, or it may come up like tonight, or over the weekend, if you do have a question and you want to connect with somebody who spoke here tonight, or, you know, in any area that you may have an interest in, you know, whether it's veterans, the DOR, other -- all these different agencies, you know, email me and I will connect you with the alumni who worked in those areas. And then you could further, you know, really look at how they use the degree to go into the various -- so just email me and we'll make that connection right away, all right.

 

back to top

 

>> I have something really [inaudible] and I'd rather go through the GRE and the -- I've been in school for a while. I can tell you from my [inaudible], by the time I entered this program, it was 20 years. I've been working with the disability field for 28 years and so I have a lot of knowledge in the field. But you know, even the range of master's program of what we predict [inaudible]. The woman next to me is my mentor. I wouldn't have done it but I entered the first semester of this program on probationary status because they weren't quite sure about my feelings towards [inaudible]. You know, it does have med aspects and [inaudible]. Fortunately, I was able to do well the first semester then they allowed me into the program. So even somebody like me, you know, if I can do it, I'm sure everybody in this room could do it [laughter].

>> And I'm the same way. I struggled with a learning disability, ADHD and all that. But then because of my learning disability, my GP was just under like a 2.5 just under 2.5 and [inaudible], they're not my friends [laughter]. They're not my friends. And I do this thing being and I was telling [inaudible] because she was asking about [inaudible]. It put me on the spot, Ivy. But I told I'm like, "Don't worry about it. You know, it's like I was on the academic probation the first semester that I was in the program and, you know, it's not like you go because it's like you're going to do well in this program because you want to be there. And you want to be there, you're going to end up doing really well. So don't keep [inaudible] yourself about it."

 

back to top

 

>> The GRE for, has never -- you got that -- never been a factor that keeps somebody out of this program. Not [inaudible] GRE, we'll take out of the program. The university requires it. We look at your GPA but we often factor in your GPA with last year or a year ago. We look more at your statements of why you want to be in the program. We look at recommendations. Getting good recommendations from people who really know you and can attest to you, you as a person, you as a professional, you as a student and then coming into the interviews with us. That's why we look at all those pieces because if you were just to look at the GRE and GPA, we would be limiting a lot of people. And we found we have plenty of evidence from over 40 years of people who on paper with just looking at forms who have never gotten into the program, let alone get out of the program and do well and do well in the community. So we don't look at it as the predictor because there's no research that says there's a great predictor of your GRE scores and how good a counselor you can be. In fact, it probably works the opposite [laughter]. So I just wanted to be really clear about that because I know people get themselves until they freak out about that.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah, they have -- yeah. Yeah, Karen's point is to call it -- [inaudible] so when you look at how [inaudible] I spend my time as an applicant, you know, don't take a [inaudible] course, don't study for hours and hours, look there are other things like Karen mentions, stating their purpose, [inaudible] for the interview and doing some volunteer work in the field to get some applied experience, that kind of stuff makes the difference. So that's where you want to spend your time. So when finish tonight, we're going to talk about not just from the nuts and bolts of applying and regarding the GREs, it's going to be part of what's part of COC measure and those are things you have to do with those, like March 1st is the date. I want you to write down in like maybe 30 places to make sure you remember that date. And that's going to be where you upload your GRE scores and you have until April 1st. But we'll get into all that kind of stuff. That kind of stuff you have to really pay attention to but the GRE, unfortunately, we have to require, you know, we as a program don't have discretion over that. We don't have discretion over when it's due so those dates say it's university-set date. I don't know if you can have some extra time on that.

 

back to top

 

>> Especially, don't tell anybody at the university that we told you that we don't take GRE scores seriously [laughter]. It would really upset them. That could [inaudible]. That's our little secret.

>> We got a question over here [inaudible].

>> Yeah [laughter].

>> We got a question over here.

>> I've seen a little bit [inaudible]. If you [inaudible] already at the beginning of like the online [inaudible]?

>> A little bit, yeah.

>> I mean, I can talk to you afterwards like --

>> The main thing I mentioned with that is for fall of 2016, we're only admitting students to the on-campus program. We're all looking at the possibility or we will have another cohort for distance students. It's either going to be fall of 2017 or fall of 2018. And we should know that by the end of this semester when that next cohort is coming in. So we got to spend some more time on it. Okay. All right, so I'm going to excuse our current students and alumni but prospective students, stick around. We still have some more stuff to get into. Yeah.

 

back to top

 

>> I just got one question, specifically [inaudible]. I'm deciding between pursuing the [inaudible]. But I'd like a little bit more information on your perspective maybe on the pros and cons of [inaudible].

>> Okay, it sounds good.

>> Thank you, guys, for being here, current students and alumni. We really appreciate you spending your time with us tonight.

>> All right. If you -- if everyone is able to stay like maybe a little bit longer, I mean like 7:05 to 7:10? If not, if you've got to leave, and Mark and I will stay as long as necessary. I don't want to speak for you, Mark, right.

>> Okay, I'll stay as long as necessary.

>> We'll stay, we'll stay to answer questions you might have for anything, you know, maybe we weren't able to fully cover. Or if you just want to talk about, you know, in further detail. So if you look at the agenda, I want to touch on a few things. As Karen mentioned, the specializations, those are optional. And I think -- I think a lot of students will pursue that when they come into the programs, when they know they have a particular interest. It could be because of the work experiences they're currently in.

 

back to top

 

It could be because they want to work with a particular population down the road. It could be because of family connection. It could be because of a personal connection to the disability area. Whatever it might be, you know, that is an option. I think one advantage of the specializations is number one, they don't take additional time in this program. So whether you do a specialization or not, the program is 60 units long. That's one factor. The other is that you get a certificate from FCSC in one of those areas of the specializations. So my area of cognitive disabilities is not like I go to my computer and type out a cognitive disability certificate and they give it to you. It's like it's a real, official document from FCSC from the graduate division. It's on your transcripts.

 

back to top

 

You can use it for job interviews, for your resume. So I think it's something that can enhance, you know, your professional background. One other advantage I've seen over my years in doing the cognitive of specialization and this applies to the various as well, is that you network with people that have those same interests. So when you make referrals, when you're walking with another individual, if you're, maybe you're in a hire event, maybe they're going to hire you. All those kinds of things can happen, I think, especially in the specializations. So when you get admitted to the program, you're given a -- you're assigned a faculty adviser and one of the discussions your adviser would have with you is do you have an interest in one of the specializations? And you can make that decision typically within the first year. I think generally it works pretty well with that. Now the next thing we have on here is the LPCC, the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor.

 

back to top

 

You can make that decision to pursue that. You want to make that decision your first semester in the program because it makes some major differences throughout the entire program. And you're going to have around 12 units of course work that the other students in the program are not going to have. You take classes in things like the DSM. You take classes in like pharmacology. A number of different areas that are specific to licensure. Now, when you finish, you finish with a rehab counseling degree but it has on the actual transcript, it'll say, Clinical Rehabilitation and Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

 

back to top

 

It means you still are a rehabilitation counselor. You can apply to take the National Certification in Rehabilitation Counseling which is the Certified Rehabilitation Counseling credentials. So you have those. You still have a background of a rehabilitation counselor but you have that focus in licensure and it makes you eligible to follow the path to licensure. And you know, we talked about the fact that when you make that decision for licensure, it's a major decision because when you finish the program, you have 3000 hours of additional time, supervised time under a clinical licensed counselor and you have to take a number of different national or state exams to become licensed.

 

back to top

 

So I think, you know, the students who go on that path, they typically have a pretty strong idea about how they want to use licensure as part of their career path for a lot of the jobs in the field like, all the individuals we have from the community colleges right there, like Karen says, you don't have to be licensed for those jobs. You don't have to be licensed for the partner relocation, for many, you know, for the rehab part of the VA. You don't have to be licensed because you know, I think it's a careful decision you want to make whether what the licensure one is to make early on.

 

back to top

 

Now, the other item we have on here are the state stipends. So with the program, there is the possibility of getting stipends from the federal government from an agency called the Rehabilitation Services Administration. They're part of the U.S. Department of Education. And the stipends can range anywhere from typically 500 to a thousand dollars per month. It really depends on how many students are taking the stipend and how much stipends we have available. And it really fluctuates from year to year.

 

back to top

 

So we can't guarantee that that would be available but it could be. And again, it kind of varies from the number, from how much we have available from year to year. So with the stipends, the strings that are attached are in the form of what's called an employment payback. So when you finish the program, you have -- the ratio is one year of employment payback for every semester of support. And the way that you meet the employment payback is by either working for the California Department of Rehabilitation or another state vocational or rehabilitation agency.

 

back to top

 

And every state in the U.S. has their own DOR. They're called something different but every state has around state vocational or rehabilitation agency. Or if you work for an agency that provides services to state VR clients. So that, you know, the reality is that most of the jobs in the field, when you finish, would count for the employment payback. Like if you work for a regional center, that would count for the employment payback. If you work for the VA, that would count for the employment back. The kind of jobs that wouldn't count would be things like if you go into what's called private rehabilitation which is where Worker's Compensation insurance company would pay for your services to help somebody get rehabilitated and then -- and back into employment.

 

back to top

 

Now in that case, you're not working with say a vocational [inaudible]. It wouldn't count for the employment payback. We talked on our agenda here, international experiences. Sometimes, these students will work internationally after they finish and that wouldn't, unfortunately, account for the employment payback. So sometimes, when students come into the program, they're given the opportunity to take a stipend and they decide not to because they don't want the strings attached to it. And so if you decide to take a stipend or don't take a stipend, we go over all the rules about it. We make sure you fully understand, you know, what it means to have a stipend. But it could, you know, it does help considerably with paying for the cost of the program. Which are -- it's around $9000 in tuition and fees over the course of a year. And the entire program, the fastest you could finish would be two years. We strongly advise people against doing that because that would mean taking five classes per semester and you know, graduate study is a lot of reading, a lot of writing, different projects.

 

back to top

 

And you might be able to get through the classes but you wouldn't really be able to integrate the information into your professional development. You would be trying just to finish the assignments on time and you really wouldn't get a lot out of it, I don't think. But if you go two-and-a-half years or three years, which is the most common option for the students in the program, you know, you want to kind of think about what the cost would be over that span of time. Let's see, the classes themselves in the on-campus program are fall/spring, no summer classes. The classes meet Monday through Thursday from 4:00 p.m. to 6:40 p.m. or 7:00 p.m. to 9:40 p.m. And the benefit, you know, to you is that you can work during the day. You can do your clinical training during the day. And most of our students have part, full or part-time positions. So, you know, the class schedule allows you to do that. As Mark said, with the exception of Mark's [inaudible] class which is at Sharp, all the classes held on campus or, you know, occasionally, we may meet here but mostly classes are going to be on campus. And then you have to get a parking pass to park on campus.

 

back to top

 

And, you know, that's not the easiest process in the world but we try to provide, you know, support in terms of how you apply for that and how does that work and so on. I want to mention one other thing with the financial systems in the program beyond the stipends. You know, you can apply for financial aid. And we do have the staff who can help you with how to apply for financial aid whether it's the different forms of loans, or different kinds of grants, or scholarships that might be available. And one name you really want to get to know well is Leesa Brockman and that's L-E-E-S-A, B-R-O-C-K-M-A-N. And so she is somebody who can help you with financial aid. It's kind of like those just practical questions on how do I order books, how do I get a parking pass, those kind of things that Mark and I, we can't, we don't really -- we're not well versed on that but Leesa will know that information very well. And I'll give you her number before the end of this. Mark, can you look it up?

 

back to top

 

>> Leesa's number?

>> Yeah, Leesa's number.

>> It's 619-594-6406.

>> Awesome. Okay.

>> I call her all the time [laughter].

>> And then one thing, one last thing we can mention or once before we talk about applying. I want to mention international experiences. So if you have an interest in doing your clinical training either part or all of your clinical training, you could do it internationally. Sharon mentioned we have two students who are going to be doing their internships in Spain. We've had students do internships not only in Spain, but in Mexico, and in Holland, and Thailand and let's see what else.

 

back to top

 

>> Ireland.

>> Ireland and the faculty have a number of connections internationally so you know, I have some colleagues in Australia. If you had an interest in doing your internship in Australia, we could definitely set that up. But it's really, you know, whatever interest you might have, that is an option within the program. And before we leave today I'll show you a part of our website that's going to give you some webinars that we gave where students came back from international internships and they talked about what that experience was like for them. So if you have an interest, you could do that. We also have had study-abroad trips to learn about the different rehabilitation agencies and different systems. We had one that went to China and to Hong Kong. We had another one that went to Ireland and to the Netherlands. And you know, those might be available at different times, you know, throughout your time in the program. So the last thing is let's take a look at a website that's important to get to know. Oaky, if you go to the recruitment letter and has everyone received a copy of that? If not, email me now. I'll send you a copy of our letter. We'll start with different features of the program and they have a website to apply to the program.

>> I can print it now if you want.

 

back to top

 

>> Okay, that'd be great.

>> How many people would like a copy? I can print it off now.

>> Okay. So this website has a URL in the letter that I'm going through right now. Well, yeah I think this is a better one. They might change it but basically what's going to happen is when you're part of the program, you've got two applications. One is to COC Mentor and that gets you into the FCSU system. So with COC Mentor, I mentioned the importance of dates. March 1, 2016 is an important date to apply to COC Mentor. And that means putting your contact information, your name, your email, those kinds of things and paying a $55 application fee. By April 1st, you have to upload your GRE -- or your GRE scores have to be sent to FCSU and your transcripts, your official transcripts have to be sent to FCSU. And so those dates are really from, you know, we don't get any -- we can't get extensions for students. Those are dates that have to be met. So with the COC Mentor, we've you know, talked about the GRE. We really want to underscore the fact that, you know, we -- that's not really going to be the most important part of the application. It really doesn't make a huge difference. It's going to be those other things, you know, getting the applied experience. You have a one-on-one interview with a faculty member like myself or Mark. You'll write us a recommendation.

 

back to top

 

Those kinds of things really are more important to focus on. And you got the COC Mentor application. You also have an application to the Department, to the academic department. It's totally separate from COC Mentor and it's called Apply Now. When you go through Apply Now, you offload your statement of preference. You upload your resume and you write the names and email addresses of three people who will write letters of recommendation on your behalf. The system then will send your [inaudible] a prompt to ask them to upload letters on your behalf. And so the date for all that material to come in is April 1st. So we always encourage students to do this ahead of time. You know, don't wait until the deadlines because once we have your materials in, we'll schedule interviews and if we feel that they're fit for the program, we'll recommend admission at that point. And actually on Monday, we're going to start making invitations to pursue for applicants to interview for the program. Right now, we have four applicants who have all the materials in and we're going to schedule them for interviews. So again, if they're, you know, if we feel like they're a good hit for the program, they'll be admitted. We'll recommend admission at that point. And if we get to a point where we filled up all our spots for the program, the maximum will be 25 students. You know, we -- you know, that might be like, it might be that you might be on a waiting list for admission if we have filled all our spots for the program. So you know, I really want to you know, again stress to get that material in as soon as you can.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah.

>> Okay.

>> I've started on this process for myself. [Inaudible] told me and I think I kind of conveyed that [inaudible]. My question is this. When you're talking about future goods, you know, online [inaudible], do you combine those or do you leave numbers when you have online courses as well as [inaudible] on-campus? Do you kind of like hand it down to your total numbers?

>> Well, that's a great question. The online versus the on-campus. They're totally separate programs. The on-campus students don't take any distance students. The distance students don't take any on-campus classes. So they're treated totally separate and you know, they're treated totally separate in terms of the classes students take. But they're all part of the same degree. The students will have the same Master's in Rehabilitation Counseling degree, the same content is addressed. Those things are the same but the delivery system is different and you don't cross over.

 

back to top

 

>> Thank you for that.

>> Sure. Yeah.

>> I have a question regarding the application process. I have -- I'm waiting for my transcript to be [inaudible] COC Mentor. Do we need to wait for all the transcripts to be received before we can start the next step where we give you the, you know, the [inaudible].

>> No, you could do those all at the same time.

>> Same time, okay.

>> Yeah, yeah -- I think especially with letter writers, I'll encourage you to start that process now. Because sometimes, you've got to remind people to upload the letter. You may -- sometimes, people have difficulty uploading a letter. They may not get the [inaudible]. There's all those kinds of things that could happen so you know, definitely start on both now.

 

back to top

 

>> And where is the information for that person? Is it Apply Now?

>> Apply Now, yeah. So the letter, Mark, are you making copies?

>> Yeah, I'm just going to --

>> So the letter that Mark is copying right now is the recruitment letter that we have for the program. It's going to have a web address. It's going to have links to COC Mentor and to Apply Now. So everything is done electronically. Yeah.

>> Thank you.

>> Yeah, [inaudible] better than this whole process of [inaudible]. Is there a way to check regarding the three who write letters? Like is there a way for me to see if the school head [inaudible] sent the [inaudible] or is that --

>> Yeah. You should be able to go to Apply Now. On your Apply Now application system, you should have your capacity to find out if the letters have been submitted.

>> Okay.

>> If not, you can always email in. I could tell you if they came in or not.

>> Okay, I'll catch you on [inaudible].

>> And I checked those. I check the Apply Now every day. I check the COC Mentor every day. So if you guys have any questions on that, I could tell you if it's coming or not. So like [inaudible], you're now talking about your COC Mentor hasn't shown up so those kinds of things, you know, check in with me and I can help you with that.

>> And the GA is going to [inaudible]?

>> That's COC.

>> Yeah.

 

back to top

 

>> Yeah and if you go to the website to our -- actually, I'll show you this right now. This part of the website deals with -- if you go to the website so we have counseling program. The way to access this is on the letter that Mark is preparing. If he goes to the part of the website that says, prospective students, you then want to click on admission procedure on campus and business programs. So part of this will have the address where the transcripts would have to be sent for graduate admission. Now a number of you have [inaudible] are able to send it so I tried so we're able to send official transcripts electronically. If that's the case, you know, you could send them now or you could have official transcripts that are -- have a seal from the university, when they're sent to FCSU. So that's the kind of thing where I would start doing that now because it could be, it could take a fair amount of time to get that done. Sometimes, you have to go back to your undergraduate university and remind them to send the transcripts. There can be delays, those kinds of things. So let's just review the address that they would go to. In terms of the GRE scores, when you signed up for the GRE, you're asked when you sign up for it, where you want your scores to go. So you're physically never going to send your GRE scores to FCSU. They're going to put a code in for FCSU. And that code is on this website right here. The code is going to be 4682 and that's simply all you put in, 4682.

 

back to top

 

>> How soon after you've taken the GRE before you receive your scores [inaudible]?

>> Typically, about three weeks.

>> Three weeks?

>> Yeah. So let's say, you know, if it's March 15th and you haven't taken the GRE, you don't want to wait that long. Because you may get passed the difficult first [inaudible]. So I was trying to, you know, present to take.

>> How many of us have actually turned and [inaudible] know of ID, you know, like [inaudible].

>> Yeah.

>> How, this is [inaudible]. We actually met through your new book, [inaudible] or does it have to be [inaudible]?

>> No, absolutely. There's no kind of like statute of limitations on these GRE scores.

>> I see that like a year-and-a-half [inaudible]?

>> You definitely, definitely use this.

>> Can I submit it?

>> Yeah, yeah.

>> Okay.

>> We've had GRE scores that are 10 years old and that's fine. So if you've taken it, don't do it you have to take it again. Yeah. So when you get into the kind of the minutiae of doing this application process, you're probably going to have questions so I definitely want you to reach out to me. And the letter that Mark is preparing will have my phone number and my email address. And you know, we'll try to give a lot of support as much as we can throughout the process. But you know, definitely go to the website, kind of check out some of the information and then I think when you've once reviewed that, you know, if you have questions, you know, definitely reach out to me and let me know how I can support you. So I know we've covered a lot of stuff in this [inaudible] time so any questions? Both Mark and I will hang out here to address anything else you may want to know but any questions before we all kind of leave?

>> You did great.

>> Okay.

>> Yeah [laughter].

>> Thank you guys.

[ Applause ]

It was great speaking to you guys. Good night and have a great weekend and that's it.

 

back to top