Accessibility

Transcript for January 2015

>> Want to hang on online probably for 15 minutes or so. We're going to begin this intro to the meeting, some introductions to different people, and then I'll try to have you go relatively early, so then you can log off after you're done, but it probably, I'm guessing, 15, 20 minutes, we'll probably have you, you know, hang on the phone if that's okay?

>> Yeah, that's fine. In terms of logging off, I'm not going to be able to probably access the conference room where you're at, because I'm having problems with my computer.

>> That's fine, yeah, as long as you're able to stay on the phone.

>> Yeah, yeah, that's no problem, and at some point, I'll be asking you to talk about, you know, your experiences as an alumnus of the program, talk about your experiences as a distance education student, and you know, just kind of some general things like that, so probably, like, five minutes or so.

>> Okay, that's fine.

>> All right, thank you, so we're going to -- I'll get back to you in a little bit, and we're still having people coming in. So we'll start in a few minutes.

>> Okay, that's fine.

>> All right, thanks. Hello Diane?

>> Hello, yes?

>> In this the Chuck Asmith. I don't see it's you. How are you doing?

>> This is Diana.

>> Hi, can you here us okay.

>> Good I [inaudible] blackboard.

>> Okay, fantastic. Okay, so what we're going to be doing is we're going to be doing some intros for everyone here. I'm guessing we would get to your part of the open house, maybe 15 to 20 minutes. So if you're able to hang on, you know, and I'll have you go relatively early, you know, when we have the alumni talk about their experiences in the program. So after you're done, and you know, you're wants to log off or you can stay on if you like. It's up to you.

>> Okay, [inaudible].

 

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>> All right?

>> Sounds good. Thomas, is there a way we can get the audio louder? It's just coming through the computer right now.

[ Inaudible Speech ]

You know the other things is are you able to get multiple people on the phone. Do you know how it operate the computer other phone calls?

[ Multiple Speakers ]

[ Inaudible Speech ]

We're going be starting in a few minutes, but in the many time, about you're not an alumnus or current student, but if you're a prospective applicant, we have a space for your name, your email address and your phone number, and I'll be following up with everyone here today with, you know, any questions that you might. Okay, so if you could fill that out right now, that'd be great. So everyone here, if you're a perspective applicant, are you guys here for of [inaudible].

[ Inaudible Speech ]

Okay, all right. So we've got [inaudible] before. This is the letter for the on-campus program. [inaudible] that. We're going to talk about both versions of the program. So this letter will [inaudible]. Let me [inaudible]. So do you have anybody I want?

>> Yeah,[inaudible]spend time there. [inaudible]

>> Okay.

>> I'm not sure [inaudible].

[ Inaudible Background Conversation ]

>> We have some refreshments if you guys wanted to and before you started [inaudible].

>> Thank you for taking [inaudible].

>> Sure.

 

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>> All right, in the meantime, well, I think this is probably a good time to get started. I'm Chuck Asha [assumed spelling]. I'm a faculty member and coordinator of the program, and I want to thank you guys for being here and learning more about the rehab counseling program here at San Diego State. So we have an agenda. I want to make sure, does everyone have a copy of that? If not, let me get that to you. I'm going to pass it over. So we're going be doing a number of things today. We're going to talk about different teaches of this program, what is the profession of rehab counseling? How could this profession get you to, and perhaps, different career options you may want to consider with this degree. And we have around the table, some current students, some alumni from the program. So this is really a good chance to hear from people who have gone through this program. You know, how are they using the degree? What was it that got them to choose the field of rehabilitation counseling for their careers? How did they experience the classes, either if they're online or they were on-campus courses. You know, the one of the things we always say is that any kind of open house or any kind of recruitment meeting, it's one thing to hear from the faculty members. It's really another thing to hear from people that have gone through the program. So this is a chance to ask them questions, to really learn about their experiences in the program. So one thing we're go to start with on the agenda, I put on here the arts of rehabilitation counseling, and we're going to show a short video from an agency called the commission on rehabilitation counseling certification, and they make a credential called the CRC credentials. Many of the people in this room have this credential. It's considered to be the gold standard of competence in rehabilitation counseling, and they produced the video last year that talks about, you know, the field of rehabilitation counseling. Sometimes there's a struggle when you say, like, "I'm a rehabilitation counselor or I'm thinking about rehabilitation counseling." To actually, you know, articulate what does that actually mean? You know, how do you describe what that profession is actually about? So this video is an attempt to really illustrate for people doing this work what this field is about. So we want to show this video, kind of as a jumping off point, you know, for the rest of the two hours we're going to spend here today, to give you a picture about what we do in this program, what we do in this profession.

[ Music ]

>> So this is friends that I met at a barbecue last Saturday and just [inaudible] paralyzed. The gentleman who was a veteran, when he came to our program, he had been homeless for years, and was heavily involved in using controlled substances.

>> The individual who had a recent motorcycle accident, couldn't use his hands anymore. He was spiraling into depression [inaudible].

[ Music ]

 

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>> Rehabilitation counselors are uniquely qualified to do what we do. I think we're the only profession that specifically addresses how to help individuals with disability get into the workplace and how to make the workplace more receptive to people with disabilities.

>> The art of rehabilitation counseling, in my opinion, is really bringing together all the focuses [inaudible] but mainly [inaudible]. So that could mean negotiation with [inaudible]. That could mean counseling for the individual. It could mean getting them in touch with community resources to show that that individual is supported to their fullest potential. We have to find him a job that is within the abilities and current skills of a client of just any job.

>> We want them to know that we're there. We're in their corner, and we want to assist them in ultimately can obtaining employment.

>> What I do is provide guidance with counseling and just support for the employers and understanding what it's like to return back to work after having a significant event happen to you. You know, things, like, "What will my employer think of me?" What would my coworkers say when I'm off work for some time?" [inaudible] can be a barrier to returning back to work but with support [inaudible] overcome if everybody's on the same page.

>> A lot of times, the [inaudible] or knocked apart by some tragic event in that person's life that changed who they are and how they identify themselves and what they're able to do. Rehab counselors can pick up those pieces and put them back together.

 

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>> I can't [inaudible]. Like, at that moment, [inaudible] really find out [inaudible]. And you want to [inaudible] that employer, we usually go out in the field and [inaudible] airplanes, but he couldn't do that physically. What [inaudible] and in relation to that, what were some of his barriers. It took between six to eight months to [inaudible]. His church was [inaudible]. They was in re wheelchair. He was learning so much information to get back in his own life, and what [inaudible] everything kind of had to be coordinated together.

>> [inaudible] after he suffered a gunshot wound [inaudible] college. So he wanted [inaudible] assisted with the modification of that, and also we [inaudible] college to obtain the degree and she is very independent. She has a very [inaudible] arms and her hands, but she still was able to drive. She was able to [inaudible] paperwork, her reports, and it was just amazing the things that she has accomplished.

>> I don't think when he walked in the door that she thought he would be making a life-altering decision. [inaudible] counselor [inaudible] and not being able to provide [inaudible]. So we directed that individual to substance abuse counseling [inaudible]. He went through the Homeless Program s to [inaudible] housing options [inaudible] by a local hospital that was in [inaudible] receptionist. [inaudible] have a job. He was ready to come [inaudible] coming back to that veteran.

[ Music ]

>> [inaudible] supports and they need the help and need the buy in, and they need the knowledge on how to fulfill their true potential.

>> Rehabilitation counseling is about empowering the individuals to be independent and to make their own decisions in life [inaudible] be involved in an accident, and we have to say to ourselves and I think we also have to have to let society know that we're one accident away from being a customer.

 

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>> There's a reason why we help others.

[ Music ]

>> All right so hopefully that video gives you a little feel for what this field is about. I think when you hear from the alumni, hear from our current students, one of the themes is probably going to be the flexibility with this degree, how many different avenues you can go in, and, you know, the people that we have here today talking about the program, everyone's doing a variety of very different things, and hopefully, the video gave you a little step to that, but again, our alumni discussions, everything else we're going to talk today about the different features of program here from the faculty, et cetera, that's going to give you a picture on what this program is about. So if you have the agenda, one of the things you're going to see is we're going ask you guys to be the first people to talk today, and if you're a student of the program, and our alumni and our current statutes can attest to this, when you're a student in program, you can't sit in the back of the room and not say anything. It's very interactive. You will get to know everyone very well. You get a chance to voice your opinions, or you have to voice your opinions, your thoughts, your perspectives on different issues in the field. So today will give you kind of a first kind of sense of what that's like, and actually makes the learning process, I think, much more exciting, much more engaging, rather than if you have to sit there for two hours and 40 minutes, which is the length of our classes, and here one of us talk for that amount of time. You wouldn't want to do that. So anyway, we just have a couple of questions we're go to ask you to respond to. So that is for our perspective applicants. What's your name? What is your interest? Do you have an interest in the on-campus or distance program, and from what you may know or not know, what is it that you want to learn about today at this meeting as your thinking about applying to this program. So Kelly, let's start with you, and again, name, on-campus/distance program, and what you hope to learn about this?

 

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>> Okay, hi, I'm Kelly, and I'm interested in the on-campus from North County, so it feels like a distance, but it's really not comparatively, and yeah, I just decided to come and meet some people today and, I guess, here do the work experiences that other alumni have, as well as current students, and [inaudible]. Those are my [inaudible].

>> Yeah, and the people we have here can definitely talk about all those, and, you know, one thing we will talk about is the balance is not easy to do but it's possible to do, and I think, you know, hopefully, some of our guests can talk about how they try to cut a balance of everything they need to do when they're in the program. So [inaudible].

>> I'm [inaudible], and I'm [inaudible] on campus. And what I want to get out of today is I just kind of want to learn more about how the program works. What kind of classes you take, and then I actually visited over summer when [inaudible] campus of [inaudible] is just kind of intriguing to me.

>> Sure. Sure, and we'll talk about that.

>> Hi, my name is Teresea. I'm hoping to study in the on-campus program [inaudible]. I'm interested in the variety of [inaudible] and learn about the whole program.

>> Okay, excellent.

>> My name's Christina. I'm interested in on-campus, and I hope to learn more about, like, the different concentrations the program has to offer and also, like, the different classes, a little more in depth about it.

>> Absolutely, thank you. Yeah, one of the things will be talking today about today are the different specializations. Also the options for the LPCC, which is the licensed professional clinical counselor. We have a number of students are interested in obtaining that license. So we'll talk about that as another potential option.

>> Hi, my name is Virginia Camper. I'm interested in the counseling and kind of interested in [inaudible].

>> Yeah, we'll talk about that [inaudible].

>> Okay.

>> There's some people, closer to the back.

>> Hi, my name is Maria, and I'd like to apply for the fall semester, and today, I'd like to learn about the [inaudible] alumni get and what their daily job is. What their daily routine looks like as rehab counselor.

>> That's, yeah, and again, that's one of the key things our alumni will be talking about today.

>> I'm Jason and I'm married to Morgan, for support, and I'm most interested in [inaudible].

>> Awesome, thanks for being here.

>> Hi, my name is Tonetta, and I'm interested in on-campus. I just want to know about the program [inaudible] got really excited about it on 'nother track.

[ Inaudible Speech ]

Yeah, it was awesome, and every now and then, drop me an email, "Whatcha doing?" [inaudible] And so I'm ready to veer off. So I'm ready to go. I like the program as a whole. So I just want to know everything about it.

>> Great, awesome. And okay.

>> My name's Janice [inaudible], and I have applied for [inaudible], and I wanted to know, I'm interested in the on-campus, and I wanted to know how long to keep your paperwork and everything in the system, so I know how much I have to redo to try to get into the program.

>> Yeah, we can spend some time on that, as well. So to see you here, and did we miss anybody? Anybody online? [inaudible] correct? Yeah, and I'll read this off. We have one person online. My name is Ed Vega, and I work for the Department of Rehabilitation as a service coordinator and [inaudible] which, by the way, is where my wife is from. So I go there a lot. [inaudible] rehabilitation counselor. I would like to know [inaudible]off-campus program. So we'll get into that, as well, because some of the people we have talking about the program went through the business program, the off-campus program. So you'll get that point of view, as well. All right, so were going to shift now to talking about the faculty and staff, a little bit about our backgrounds. Our current students and alumni can attest to the fact that even if you're assigned a faculty member, everyone's assigned a faculty member, you get to know all the faculty members very well. So we often use terms, like, community, family.

 

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Everyone knows each other people are supportive of each other. So the faculty and staff are people you would get to know very well in your time in the program. There are some graduate programs in which you only work with your major advisor. That's the only person you really get to know, and it's not like that in this program at all. You know, you get to know everyone. You're going to work with everyone, but you would be assigned a faculty advisor, and we try to follow an advising model that's similar to how we try to train you as counselors. Where you work individually with the student, and we work individually with all of our students and try to figure out what is that you want to do in your career. So when you're picking things like internship placements, when you're looking for possible jobs, when you're looking for different opportunities from the program that will help facilitate what it is that you want to do, we try to work with you individually around those goals. And when you get into the program, we try to assign you along an area that really fits maybe a direction you want to go. So I'll talk a little bit about my background, and then I'll have other faculty talk about what they do in the program to kind of give you a sense of our different areas of expertise. My own background is most of my clinical experience, and what I probably use as a professor is in the area of cognitive be disabilities, and I had a specialization in cognitive disabilities, which I'll talk about later today.

 

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You have a sense of purpose. You may have financial self-sufficiency. There's a lot of things that come from work, so [inaudible] focus in that, and again, we'll get more into that, and then in terms of research, most of my research looks at brain injury, various forms of brain injury, and how families adjust to brain injury. How do they provide care? How do they kind of change their pre-injury routine to now having this new reality, and one of things we'll talk about and I'll just touch on here, a number of articles I've done over the years have been done with students. So if you have an interest in publishing your research, having that kind of experience you can do that with the faculty, and all of us have works, publications, research with students. So that's a possible option. Okay, [inaudible].

 

>> Hi everyone. Welcome. My name is Nan Hampton [inaudible]. I'm and advisor here, and like Chuck, I advise students in the program as well, but not like Chuck is dealing with students who have an interest in cognitive disability. I advise students who are in general rehab, which means who have not [inaudible] any specialization, but with being interested in [inaudible] different types of disabilities, and the courses I teach include multicultural counseling, group counseling, [inaudible], and as you all know, our field is becoming much more diverse than ever. So as counselors, we will be serving people from different cultural backgrounds. So learning about different culture, having the sense of culture, community, environment is very important for rehab counselors. So that's one of the courses that I teach, and that's my passion [inaudible]. So when I do research, I focus on culture issues. How culture affects rehabilitation process in individuals and how culture affects individuals' attitudes towards people with disabilities. Another course I teach is [inaudible] and if you're working the fields, particularly [inaudible] then you probably [inaudible] so important. So learning about the roles, the dynamics in our practice, which is rehabilitation counseling, is very important and is another course I teach, and also, in our curriculum, students have to do practicums, have to be interested to learn how to apply knowledge to actual work. So, and that's another two courses I teach. Anything else?

 

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>> The value of research projects.

>> Research projects, I mentioned a little bit, that is one of the culture issues, and how culture affects individual factors towards disabilities and how culture affects individuals' rehabilitation process, and that's it.

>> What -- because I'm not sure how long you're going to stay, but one of things I asked Dr. Hampton or want her to talk about is the international trips she's led to different places around the world, and one of the things we'll talk about is, you know, when you do your internships, you may have an opportunity to have other kinds of international travel experiences. Dr. Hampton has led a lot of those efforts. Nan, is there anything that you want to say about that?

>> Sure. Part of our programs focus is to train our student to become what is the term? Internationally knowledgeable and competent. So we have led students to different countries, Peru, but had a [inaudible] to China and Hong Kong. We learned how people provide services over there, and [inaudible] and went to Europe to learn how people are doing services there for people to [inaudible]. So, and if any of you are interested in international rehab, or international trips to go abroad to learn how other people are doing similar things, and amassing skills, then this is the program you want to join, because that's one of the interesting things have, an international vision.

>> I think [inaudible].

 

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[ Laughter ]

>> Hi, I'm Mark Tucker. I'm actually a graduate of this program from a long time ago, and in the program, this is actually my first year teaching full-time in the program. I have taught part-time for a while, and the courses I typically teach, we have a couple, two-semester sequence entitled Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disability. It's actually held up on the Sharp Hospital Complex, and also is kind of the research methods course that's a part of the program. If your little math phobic, don't worry about that too much. We'll work with you on that stuff, and the class isn't real math heavy anyway. So there's kind of a primary course I teach in the program. For my research standpoint, I'm kind of really interested in the ways that, like, education and training can be used to kind of help level the playing field, employment wise, economic wise, for folks with disabilities and then it's kind of another area that I spend time involved in is needs assessment, kind of looking at the needs of folks with disabilities as they relate to employment kind of from a variety of different ways of getting the perspective of what [inaudible] disability [inaudible]. The people who provide services to them. The perspectives of employers who are kind of an important part of the equation and when it comes to employment, and a lot of that stuff is actually coordinated down here. The needs assessment work, where we've got our academic department up on campus, but we have our institute down here, where all the staff are working on projects that are related to disability employment and education, and it's another side of things I'd encourage you to get familiar with as you get into the program, because it's kind of a lot more going on than I think might be apparent when just kind of walk through our department up on campus, and you'll pick up on a lot of stuff up there, as well, but even more down here.

>> Karen.

>> Hello, I'm Carrie [inaudible]. Can you hear me over here?

>> Yeah, that's fine.

>> It's okay? Okay.

>> [inaudible], Carrie. It's not a problem.

>> Welcome, everybody. Thank you for coming out on Friday night to see our current students, our successful graduates. To me that's what this program is all about. The fact that people would calm and want to talk to new people. I mean, we absolutely get our best referrals from our students and our graduates. That's how we keep kind of widening the circle, and we're probably getting close to 1000 graduates from our program. So we've been around for a long time, and they're everywhere. They're all over the country. Some are international. And we stay in touch with a whole bunch of them, which is really exciting, because they're the ones that provide studying opportunities as far as projects in classes. They're the ones that provide internship opportunities, and they're the ones that hire you. So it's important to keep those connections. I chair our department, part of the administration rehabilitation and post-secondary education. I teach in this program, in the rehab program. I also work with our doc students in the department, and it's pretty unique place. I'm sure everybody talks about, you know, just part of our world, it's Inner Work Institute. So that the department is really the core of the institute. So all the faculty in the department support the institute and we all, the faculty, and all the staff at the institute, we write grant proposals together. We get funding. We create programs. We do different kinds of contracts with colleagues in our state and across the country, and all of those kinds of things. [inaudible]

 

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And all of those opportunities open opportunities for our students. So it's not just that we need more work to do and that we love writing grant proposals right? Nan and I are in the middle of writing one right now, but we write those because it offers opportunities to students. The grant that Chuck just got and the grant that Nan and I are hoping to get, 75% of the funds go directly to students. So those are student scholarship funds for people who come into the program, which is pretty cool. So we do that. We don't get much even to operate on, but we feel it's important, because we want to be able to support students, and even though people at San Diego State will tell you that our tuition is still affordable, which it is, if you want to compare to a whole lot of places, it's still really affordable. That doesn't mean that it still doesn't make a big dent in your checkbooks, right? So we try to help wherever we can, and that fuels the field. You know, the payback to those, which you'll hear a lot more about, is working in the field, and we assume that if you're coming into the program, that's your goal, too, is to work in the field. So it's kind of a win-win for everybody. Just for my background, I do probably spend a lot of work in the area of transitioning for students with disabilities as they move from the K-12 system into adulthood. I was a special ed teacher for many, many years, before I came to the university, so I know little bit about both of those worlds, about the K-12 world and the adult world, and so that's been a lot of the work that I've done over the years and also in the area of assistive technology. So we have a lot of exciting things that are happening with that. I do a certificate with our college of engineering program in technology and training people in that area, and so, I'll stop there. I know I'm probably only supposed to say a little bit.

 

 

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>> And the person that she'll get to know very well, both during the application process during the program, after the program is Lisa Brocken. Lisa, if you could say little bit about yourself.

>> Hello everyone. I'm Lisa Brocken and I graduated with my master's degree in education, secondary education, which is one of the other master's degrees that we offer in our CE department. My specialization was in [inaudible]. So I really enjoy helping the students. I go from inquiries to your last day of payback.

[ Laughter and Inaudible Comment ]

 

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So I have a lot of student contact. It's my focus area. It's what I really love. I did [inaudible] rehabilitation pathology. So if you'd like to know little bit more about that certificate, I would be happy to give you the details on it. It helps me be able to help you with your technology, even if you don't have a disability. Sometimes you're technologically challenged. So I am here to help you out. I keep up on all the latest technology. I own the latest technology so that I can play with it, help you with that. I also am part of the SDSU system. So I can go in. I can look at your application. I can see where things are going wrong. Where things are going right. My heart is here. Please do contact me during your application process either by phone or by email, and I would be happy to troubleshoot anything that you're having trouble with. While you're in the program, I will also be at orientation to help explain a little bit about our scholarship program. Each scholarship is different. Each scholarship has a little bit of different criteria, and I would be happy to explain the relationship between our scholarship program and the student loans, which you will be applying for at San Diego State. The next process is I will, you know, assist you anytime that you need help. If need a [inaudible]. If you need registration information. You know, I'm the go to person for the three years you'll be in the program, and then afterwards, I'll be following up, and try not to do it in an annoying way, about where you're working. How you're doing, and sharing that with everybody, the faculty, class, and they want to know what former students are doing. So that's pretty a little snapshot about what I do, but I just want everyone to know that I work for you. So definitely put me to good use.

>> So were going to shift a little bit on the agenda and, yeah?

 

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[ Inaudible Speech ]

Yeah, you'll still be talking.

>> Happy just to be here to listen and see [inaudible].

>> He has so many roles.

[ Multiple Speakers ]

>> So we're going to shift to the agenda a little bit. I'm going to have alumni go first before our current students because we have a few people online that I told them they could leave once they had a chance to talk. And so for everyone, our alumni and current students we're going to ask you to talk two to three minutes. You know, maybe three minutes. Maybe a little bit more, but around that amount of time, and talk about what was your experience in the program? How did you experience the classes? And how are currently using the degree? And especially if you're out in the field, if you're an alumnus, you know, working for a number of years, how are you making use of this particular degree, and anything else, you know, you feel that our prospective students need to know. You know, feel free to say whatever you'd like to say. So Kimberly, we're going to start with you, and Kimberly was a student in our distance program. So anything you want to say, Kimberly, the floor's yours.

 

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>> Hi everyone. Can everyone hear me okay? Okay, so first of all, I want to start with saying that the rehabilitation program was a great experience for me. I felt very supported by the faculty and the staff in the program, and, you know, Lisa was extremely helpful in answering my many questions that I had along the way, and, you know, that's important to have that kind of contact person when you're in a distance learning program, because you often can feel [inaudible]. So that was very helpful to me, and, you know, going into the program, I had very little experience working with individuals with disabilities. I actually had a human resources background, and so, you know, going into the program not having a lot of experience, I learned so much from my classmates and from our discussions and our working together and our projects. That was extremely helpful to me in my success in the program. And I knew early on that I wanted to work in higher education. So I, like, my first year in the program, I went and I was looking for an internship, and I actually interned at a community college, and eventually, when that finished, I went to California State University, and I did an internship, as well, working with students with disabilities, and that internship actually eventually turned into a full-time position where I'm currently working now, and that was awesome for me to be working with students while I was in the program, because I felt like I was able to apply what I was learning while I was working with my students, and, you know, the one thing, you know, that I tell students now who I work with, and I just would encourage all of you is just, internships. They're extremely helpful. It's a great way to get, you know, first-hand experience, and you can learn, you know, about the field, and you can kind of figure out maybe certain areas that you want to specialize in, or maybe you found that you don't like a certain area. So that was very helpful to me, and like I said, I have nothing but great things to say about the program, and, you know, I wish you all the best of luck.

>> Thank you, Kimberly. And Dianna.

>> Okay, can you hear me okay?

>> Yes.

 

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>> Okay, okay, well, my experience in the program. I graduated with a bachelor's degree in sociology/human services, and I worked with a lot of students with disabilities, and I wanted to increase my knowledge in the counseling field in rehabilitation, and so I, too, have a disability. So I got to know my counselor and what she does, and I got interested in the program. So that's kind of how I was interested in it. In my three years of school, the two years I actually got experience at the Department of Rehabilitation where I gained a lot of knowledge of how to help students with disabilities, and the students were ranging from physical disabilities to mental disabilities, and just gaining a lot of knowledge there, which is, I'm much more confident now. What I'm currently doing is I am actually applying for the doctoral program in educational leadership, because I would like to later on teach courses. So hopefully that I can pursue, but currently, I am looking for a part-time job working in the disability student services at a junior college. I just had a baby, so I need to have something where it's part-time for right now, but the program is flexible, in a sense, for me, obviously, online I was able to work around my schedule, and as well as doing my internship, as well, together. It's just great. I think the number one thing that I just encourage students who are looking into this program is to stay in communication with your teachers what you are in the program. They're the ones that are going to guide you and give you all the knowledge that you need in order to be successful in all your school courses. So that's about it.

>> Thanks so much, Dianna. I appreciate it.

>> You're welcome.

>> So kind of on the theme of our distance education program, Chris Montgomery.

>> Good afternoon everybody. I drove in from San Jose, California.

>> Wow.

 

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>> Just to provide my support to the program here at San Diego State, because I feel so strongly about this program. I currently work as a senior vocational rehabilitation counselor [inaudible] professional, and I serve in our area, migrant and seasonal farmworkers with disabilities. That's my specialty, and that's been my specialty for a number of years. I originally received my BA in sociology from San Jose State University, and when I was given the opportunity to come to San Diego State to get into their rehabilitation program, I thought to myself, "Oh, my God. In my going to be up for the challenge?" And at the same time, I thought, "Well, I have over 20 years with the department. What else is there to learn?" Right? And, boy was I wrong. It was such a learning experience for me, a veteran counselor who has been with the department for over 20 years, and I felt like, you know, maybe there's not a whole lot more, but I want to go there. I want to try. And it gave me the basic foundation from really, to work from as a counselor. It was the missing void in my professional career. I mean, I had started to do the work of a counselor with a degree in sociology, a bachelor's degree in sociology, you can we go so far, but the program here allow me to really learn what it is rehabilitation counselors are supposed to be doing, and that was what I had been missing in my career. It was a humbling experience because I, again, I felt I was a veteran counselor who didn't need any more education, but boy, again, you know, it was a real, true learning experience, and it was a challenge I'm happy that I took. It's made me a much better counselor, and I'm a graduate of the 2013 class, and it's made a much more effective counselor, and it's provided me with the counseling skills. It's enhanced my ability to work with my consumers, with my clients, more effectively.

 

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It's just, as I said earlier, filled that professional void that I was missing in my program. At work, the timing just worked out that in order for us to continue working for the Department of Rehabilitation, which is where I work, California Department of Rehabilitation, you needed to have a master's degree. I didn't know it at the time when I enter the program, but just as I was graduating, that's what took place. If you didn't have master's, you are going to be demoted, and now, with a master's degree, I was able to maintain my position and to continue doing what I had been doing with my migrant seasonal farmworker population. So it saved me. You saved my job. Thank you. Since I got my master's degree, I've got a lot of positive changes. It seems like as soon as people found out I had a master's degree, I was called to do workshops at conferences, national conferences in Washington DC, as well as California conferences, and even at my age, I was offered employment in the U.S. Department of Labor was one, and another one was [inaudible] which is the medical facility in the San Jose area. So it's been just a godsend here for me. It's been a wonderful, wonderful experience, and I can't say enough about professors. I have so much respect for you guys, because during the time that I was here, I receive not only the support that we as students need going into a new educational environment, but you receive the type of communication that a really wants to have with an instructor. When I needed to talk to the professor, they were there. I could communicate with them via email or by phone, but it was easy. They're very accessible and that was a real plus for me. The value, again, of this program for me personally, it's at a significant impact, and the online courses and way you guys have the system set up works perfect, because it allows us individuals that work full-time to be able to participate and be a part of the program. So I just want to say thank you and to extend my appreciation. Again, I came over from San Jose. I drove on a day off just to be here because I feel like it's a way of giving back for the education [inaudible]. The training that I received here was exceptional. So thank you.

 

 

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>> Thank you [inaudible]. Are you driving back tonight?

>> No, we're going to spend the night.

[ Laughter ]

[ Inaudible Speech ]

>> I'd like to say about Chris, Scott are [inaudible] award for being voted the most influential person in his cohort. So he's being humble over there but he did a lot of work to make sure that his groups worked together, and he did a lot, a lot of work, and he deserves his reward for being one of our outstanding students. Thank you.

>> Thank you, Chris.

>> Thank you very much.

[ Applause ]

>> All right, so let's hear from some other alumni. We have many here. Samantha.

>> Gosh, it's hard to follow.

[ Laughter ]

[ Inaudible Speech ]

 

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Because I graduated in May, as well, but I was on campus. So just finished up May of 2014, and when I came in, probably as some of you are now, I knew I wanted to work with individuals with disabilities, but I really wasn't exactly sure what type of place or, you know, in what setting. So when I was in the program, one of the greatest things was having the freedom to do internships at different places, different groups of people, and was probably one of my favorite parts, I should say, the program, and I ended up doing some cognitive disabilities [inaudible]. So Dr. [inaudible] was my counselor, and gosh, I interned in in the college setting, with the state department, and did a project with veterans, and just tried to get my hand on every single thing [inaudible] I want to end up doing, and I now, I work at a charter school counseling the adult [inaudible] college and I run a transition program there. So I work with juniors, seniors, and graduates to help them transition out of high school and into the real world [inaudible] college work [inaudible]. So I have a great school for that, but I love it. I didn't really know much about the charter schools in the beginning, but it's an amazing forum. The program that I work with has been grant funded. The program is so -- we're actually, we're our own school district, and then we worked [inaudible] with the special education [inaudible] for, like, [inaudible]. So we're connected with them. So I go up there about once a month, but we serve our students down here [inaudible], and another thing I remember, one of the first thing that pops in was the professors that, you know, look around the room. These [inaudible] will be your colleagues in the future, and that is very true. Everywhere I go, you know, the different department of rehabilitation offices around [inaudible], you really can't go anywhere without seeing a former classmate or somebody, and it's really neat because a lot of times, I'll get emails or, you know, be doing something work-related, and I'll say, "Oh, I know them." You know, I remember that name. So it is a very, I mean, it's getting bigger, but it is a very close knit [inaudible], and as much as there's a very large undergrad, so coming here was very nice because classes are small. All of the professors know you, and you get to know them personally, and they're always available [inaudible] or to advise about what type of internship to do or what you want to do, or various things you want [inaudible]. So, yeah, you know, I miss it. I like working and not being in school anymore, but I do miss the, you know, the family, and it's great to get together with those former classmates and just see where everyone is.

 

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>> Sarah.

>> My name is Sarah [inaudible], and I graduated from the program in May of 2013, and I loved the program. I did the psychiatric certificate, and right now I'm working at the National Alliance [inaudible] and lobbies, and [inaudible] family court specialist course, which will be acquired through [inaudible] university, and I love writing and I'm [inaudible]. I love being able to support the families and teach the family members how to better support their loved ones living with mental illness. I've also had the opportunity to work with a family here, teaching the psychiatric [inaudible] as well. I think the best part of this, of what I would recommend, that when I was in this program, I did a lot of networking, not only do you get to know the students around you, the people that you work with, I also had the opportunity to attend conferences and to attend the conferences and to just volunteer, actually, where I could meet and mingle with people who would become my coworkers in the future, and it's true. Look for internships in the field you're interested in kind of trying. I did an internship. I was the disability services coordinator for a Alliant International University for both their San Diego and Irvine campus, and was also their assistant [inaudible]. I had an absolute blast getting to know the students and really understanding how to work in the secondary education community as an [inaudible].

 

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I liked that a lot more than [inaudible]. And it was a lot of school, but we didn't have to do all the other stuff that you have to do [inaudible]. But then I also did a practicum, or as part of my internship, I spent at Quarter Clubhouse, and I know some of you are more familiar with clubhouses. They're a psychosocial rehabilitation facility that helps people who have severe mental illness get back on their feet. They have computer classes, vocational classes, cooking classes. There's just a variety of opportunities, and that really got me the opportunity to work one-on-one with not only some really unique people but also to be able to see how everything was organized and be part of an organization. And my final internship was kind of split. I did a portion of it [inaudible] where I got to work one-on-one with people who wanted to keep their jobs, and it was exciting this until they had me as an intern, they'd never had a special service for people with disabilities, and so they were really excited about that. Unfortunately, I didn't have enough dress service hours, so then became a counselor at [inaudible] in their [inaudible]. That was really exciting, as well. But again, along the way, I try to be as outgoing as I could and meet as many people as I could, and in the long run, it really help me find jobs that I wouldn't otherwise been able to find, because people started calling me. That's how I got the job at Alliance is the coordinator. The person had a high-risk pregnancy, and she said, "Hey, we just talked three days ago, and I have to go out. Are you interested?" And I was, like, "Yes!" And it was an exciting experience, and this program truly prepared me for it.

 

[ Inaudible Speech ]

 

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>> [inaudible] Class of 2003, working at the Civic Regent Center current to help individuals were developed a disabled. Have 27 years of experience in the field, just doing a lot of vocational work for people with a variety of disabilities, but I've been around here long enough, and I just decided since him here, I might as well work part-time. So I teach part-time with Karen in the rehab technology course. My background is in a lot of assistive technology, devices. Karen and I started working together professionally a long time ago building things and creating devices for people so they could go to work. So that's kind of currently what I do, and class has been so meaningful and a life changer for me, because when I finished, and as you go through it, you come out on the other side changed as an individual. Not just learning skills as a counselor, but if you don't feel like you're a totally different individual by the time you graduate, then you've missed out on something. So take your time. Really, really enjoy the experience because you're colleagues that are going to the program with you, you come out on the other side having those friendships and supports and that network. I go to a lot of transition fairs at high schools for transition students who are getting ready to exit into the adult world, and as I look around the room, almost every single community college table representing community colleges, there is a graduate at each one of those tables who work in the DBLS or DSL services. So it's amazing when you go around the community, alumni everywhere, and when you fix the program and you put San Diego State master's rehab counseling program on that resume, I can tell you it makes a big difference when you go to apply, they are applying for [inaudible] jobs in Nevada or other states, when they see that, that says a lot about the quality of the program that you've been through, and I think that there's probably a better chance that she'll get hired, compared to if you went to so other schools with a similar degree. So this is a big, this is like in the top 10 rated rehab programs in the country. So we've always been around either eight or nine. So I mean, this is really, really significant, but one of the experiences that recently came to light for me is you'll get a course in grant writing and a course in organizational studies, and what I was able to do, along with an undergraduate from this program, she and I wrote a proposal for a grant two years ago, 2012, and we actually got it funded for $20,000 the first year and $10,000 the second year. Part of that grant, working transition students from Sweetwater High School, we partnered with Chuck and his course in the assessment. So when you get into Chuck assessment class, you'll be working with some transitioning students completing a vocational inventory that will help, you know, document what their interests are, what their skills are, and then guide their vocational choices. So you can choose to partner with Chuck's class, even though the grant sunsetted last year in October. So we don't have any more funding, but we're still partnering with Chuck, and those will continue on for quite some time to go, and we hope that we can expand that in other ways. So that experience of learning to write a grant proposal really came as a benefit to me, and our partners, and to Sweetwater and the students. So it was a very, kind of, meaningful outcome. I didn't realize it when I was taking the grant writing class.

[ Laughter ]

 

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Because that can --

[ Multiple Speakers ]

Can be very daunting and hard work, you know, but it paid off.

>> It's true. I'm helping the director of [inaudible] in Sanford with grand writing right now. So it's [inaudible].

>> So it's a life-changing program. Not professionally, but personally, as well.

>> Kristin.

>> Well, everyone's pretty much said everything. I think it's like Chris and [inaudible] had mentioned. One of the things that I really enjoyed with the program, I recently graduated [inaudible].

>> I was going to say [inaudible].

[ Laughter ]

 

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>> But one of the things I really enjoyed was having that, like, connection with everybody, where you really are on campus, out in the community, and you know everybody in the field, and for me, I work for the community college district, and the program we work for, we serve students at [inaudible] continuing ed [inaudible] everywhere. So for me, it's nice knowing that if I have a student who is having challenges at one campus, I might just [inaudible]. So I think in this sense, too, that we help each other out, whether you're in the program with them currently or you've graduated or you've met them through some transitioning mentor some other reason. I think everyone, they just have that community going, and you become family. If you graduate leave this program without having really close friends, you've probably done something wrong. Because it's really hard for you to leave without any friends. I mean, you become family, and I think one of the things I like the most is how you get support from, you know, Chuck, Nan, Mark, Marge and James and having everyone just be there for you, and, you know, I've had many, many opportunities for many different things, and Karen was brave enough to take a group of students to Ireland [inaudible]. So I got to participate in that, and it's nice knowing that, you know, kind of your professors and instructors are going to include you in their research projects or in their grant proposals and things like that. So, I mean, for me I think the biggest part was just the networking and having the opportunity to do these various, different things, because, you know, I came in here with the mindset, like, this is the field I want to pursue and that's it. So I did specialize in psychiatric disabilities. However, I'm now brought back for a second certificate in cognitive disabilities and I think just knowing that everyone there to support you, it makes it a lot easier having that. I work 60 hours a week, and I don't have time for school, but I know that, you know, if I do have an issue that I can just talk to one of the professors about it, and everything will be fine. So I can't say enough about the program and just how much it's really helped getting to know everybody and really just professionally knowing that if there's an issue, someone is going to take me seriously because I've graduated from this program. I've talked to people from other programs who, you know, were, like, "You know, so-and-so over at DSPS thought I was kidding because, you know, I said something and they asked where I went to school and it wasn't SDSU." So they kind of didn't take them as seriously [inaudible]. But, you know, everyone thinks very highly of this program, and it's for a good reason. It's because everyone's there to support you, and you may have some challenges down the road with, you know, time management and things like that. [inaudible] it's a pretty demanding program but it's very manageable and you get the support of everybody, and you make it through just fine, and you stay connected with them for really long time. So enjoyed it.

 

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[ Multiple Speakers ]

>> My name is Christina, and I graduated in May of 2013. My background was bachelor's in criminal justice, and I decided -- what brought me to this program was the idea of being a correctional counselor. Helping offenders rehabilitate, and I current help ex-offenders transition from being in custody to the community. I'm a federal probation officer, and that's what I do. So I feel that the program really expanded my knowledge. They were very supportive, and my focus was, and I hopefully will come back to school, but my goal is LPCP and have a licensed credential, but I left that program without the credential, but I am contemplating going back. For me, my focus is in, I supervise offenders, all kinds of offenders, but I find myself my strongly in terms of people who are unvoiced. My internship was at [inaudible] Prison. It was in the [inaudible] Prison, and worked for the State Department in psychiatry. So my specialization as intern was vocational specialist. I assist the offenders in any area, but particularly, when they're unemployed or some of them do have mental health issues. The elderly. Some of them are elder. They can make plans too, and I refer them to the Department of Rehab, and where did I learn that? Here. I feel that as a probation officer, yeah, you study law enforcement, but it's very -- I'm very fortunate because I not only have that law enforcement mentality, but I'm also the social worker type. I'm [inaudible] and that's something that nobody will take away. I try to understand more the offender. Why they did things. What type of resources do they need? Versus other officers that all they think about is punishment and [inaudible]. So I'm very fortunate where I'm at right now. I love what I do, and I'm looking of rule out credentials in the different areas. And I find the program, wow. It's quite intense. It is quite intense, but you know what? That makes it -- I love challenges, and I think, like everybody says, the program is very -- it has its reputation. I feel proud every time I say I graduated from San Diego University with a master's in [inaudible]. People really look at you differently, and everybody is very supportive. At the time I started coming to campus for school, there was a point, because my employment, I couldn't. So I was a hybrid student. I was on campus, online, and they were very flexible about it. I learned a lot, and [inaudible] challenging, but when you graduate, you feel so much relief.

 

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[ Laughter ]

I've earned it, 3-1/2 years, [inaudible] 3-1/2 years. And that's another thing I suggest. Don't rush to the program, because you miss out on a lot of things. There's people here that probably want to complete the program in two years. Don't do it. [inaudible] Take your time and enjoy the ride, and yes, do internships, network. It was a great experience.

>> Thank you. Did we miss any alumni? Did we get everyone? So let's hear from our current students. You know, what are you experiencing in the glasses? You know, we talked a bit about internships. What kind of training are you currently doing? Are you in a specialization? What do you hope to do as you're getting closer now to graduation? So Brad, let's start with you.

 

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>> Well, I drove from Alpine, so, I'm on the three-year plan, and I have one more semester, and entered the AP specialization, and as far as internships go, I got really lucky, I suppose. I've done, like, everybody's talked, it's like a small group but yet broad. Working with transition students to veterans to I did a little bit of time at the State Department Rehab. Some time at VA and that's for the AP certificate at [inaudible], and they're all totally different, but yet the same. It's kind of weird how it works that way. It is super broad, so you will have the opportunity to kind of learn and figure out where you want to be and what you want to do. So what everybody is saying is true, and as far as workload, I want to say, you know, like I said, I'm a slow one. Other people that it faster, but it's manageable. It is manageable. You know, it obviously adds to your schedule. You going to have to set aside time. It's kind of tough at times when you say to your family, "No, I've got homework to do." And they go off and do something else, and you're sitting at home doing homework. That's not really fun, but it's not so much that it makes you hate the program or hate what you're doing, because you're learning and you're meeting wonderful people. So it's kind of worth it, I suppose, and then I really can't wait to take the load off [inaudible]. Wow, what else did you want to hear?

>> Yeah, what do you think you're going to be doing once you graduate?

>> I don't know. I know, I'm kind of, well, I'm kind of hoping, and it's all kind of timing, too, when they had the job opening. It would be awesome to roll into the VA with a vet and just try to be in the VA community is just kind of, you've kind of got to understand the system and get with the program. So I kind of hope that rolls into a job, but, I mean, you can, from junior colleges to high school, to, you know, State Department of Rehab to private. I'm not going to lie. I put feelers out everywhere, you know? I mean, applying for different things through the program towards your internships, because I want to apply to -- yeah, I suppose I hope the VA thing works out, but if not, there's other, you know, I don't want to limit myself.

 

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>> I'm going to recruit him for [inaudible].

[ Multiple Speakers ]

So it's been a really, really good experience.

>> Tonya.

>> Hi, [inaudible]. [inaudible] last year in December. So I have the [inaudible]. What can I say? It's been a huge, amazing experience. You don't get faculty like this every program. The faculty is really accessible to any questions or concerns that you have, and when I came into the program, came in as a [inaudible], and because of the fact I could get a professional standpoint of what it's like to be a rehabilitation counselor and to also have the experience as a consumer. Like that's a lot of knowledge I can pass down to my clients, and that's what I wanted to do because it took a lot, especially me being an advocate. You have to be proactive, especially as a client to know, okay, this is where I want to go to school. This is what I want to do, and this is what I want. Some clients don't know that and it helps us to find out what it is. The internships were amazing. I actually interviewed for two of them [inaudible]. So I'm working at the Department of Rehab as [inaudible], and I'm also working at the community college as an intern. Actually, so I'm working with students with all types of disabilities who want to know basic computer skills. And so I'm hopefully, like, in the future I want to at DOR, Department of Rehab, so I can pass along my experience to future consumers future clients, but VA, of course, I have my eye out on VA and hopefully, you know, like, I probably would like to work at DOR.

 

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>> And Paul.

>> Here. I was just in the area, and I just stopped by. Like you've heard, like, I mean, this is, like, family. It's wonderful seeing who my new family members are going to be and listen to the old-timers when they went to college, you know, horse and buggy stop, and just being here, you know, and that's what this program means, you know, to me. It's really that much. If you're like me and you're in the applications process. For me, that was the hardest part. Oh, my gosh. It's, like, if you're concerned about GRE score, don't be. It just matters that you have one. You know, and that was a big fear for me. You know what I'm saying. I mean, I look at, but I'm 54 years old, and I had to, you know, look at the fact I hadn't been in school in 30 years, and it was, like, oh, my God. And they want me to take this SAT test? You know, geez. But I made it through that. I made it to the application process. I mean, I made it to the Promised Land, and that that was the rehabilitation program, and, you know, one of the recurring themes that you may have heard since you've been sitting here is, "I want to do this, and I want to do that, and I want to do that." And that's not a bad sign. That's just what this program opens up to you. You know, like, I thought I wanted to go to work for the Department of Rehabilitation, but I've always worked with ex-offenders. You know, I want to open up my own program, and the VA, and my gosh, the VA is doing a lot. You know, so in all of those, actually, I'm in my second year, and I thought I knew what I wanted to do when I started when I started the program, but now it's, like, I'm not really sure. You know, I just applied for the VA internship that Chuck got together at the Department of Rehabilitation, and so I'm going to have that under my belt. I'm still going to be looking at working with, continue to work with ex-offenders, but it's just whatever got you here. Well, your education that you to the point where you have the opportunity, but I believe it's our personalities and our interests that really say to us, you know, this might be my vocation. This be my calling, and I think the fact that you're here shows that, and so go with it. You know what I'm saying? Lisa, she's kind of like the oracle in The Matrix.

[ Laughter ]

If you've ever seen that movie. She doesn't bake cookies, you know, or anything like that, but --

>> I can bake.

 

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>> Oh, okay. I'll hold you to that. Her office is always accessible. There have been times when I felt isolated. You know, I get caught up, you know, in going in and talking with Lisa has always, she's had the plethora (We're graduate students now. We can use words like that). I mean, she's been there, done that, in any crisis or, you know, creative crisis that I thought I had, she was there to walk me through to a solution. So you always have that opportunity. Talk, the [inaudible] mentioned his assessment class earlier, and I'm sitting here, and I'm, like, it's, like, information from the classes, you know, it kind of, like, hits you in waves, and I'm internalizing some of this information. You know, I've had classes with Professor Tucker. All of these professors are accessible. Any fears or concern that you might have, they are the type of individuals that will make time for you and meet and look at what it is that's on your mind and work with you to come to a solution. I think the fact that you're here today. Hopefully, I'll be seeing you again, and yeah, I don't know what I'm going to do. I thought I had no idea, but I'm just happy to have all of these options and choices open and available [inaudible].

>> No, it's great. Thank you. One thing about the lists here. The like groupings that they have, is that you wouldn't believe the amount of jobs that come through there. I don't know, five, ten a week? It's amazing. So, I mean, they're out, and [inaudible]. And they're from around the country. [inaudible] Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Kentucky. I mean, there's a lot here in California but they're, I mean, if you want to stay here you can go elsewhere too. So I just want to bring that up. I forgot all about that. So that's what [inaudible]. So you see all the jobs out there. It's very promising.

>> International internships. [inaudible]

>> Yeah, we have one of our students doing an internship in Spain right now. She's there [inaudible].

[ Inaudible Speech ]

>> I was sitting here, Steve, in 1992, and [inaudible].

>> So I got my Masters here in 1993 and I've been with the team since.

 

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>> Some people just, yeah.

>> So my instructor for assistive technology, years ago, so what's awesome about this program in lieu of the thesis you write a grant, a fundable grant. So I got an A and a job because I specialize in American Indian and tribal vocational rehab program. There's 85 of them throughout the country, from Alaska to New York to South Carolina. So I read the postings on a train, American Indian Rehabilitation Program, which is a 21-plus graduate certificate, and they apply those to their master's degree. So I was one of three American Indians from 1970 through '93 to get a master's degree. Since 2001, when I started the [inaudible] program, I've had 18 [inaudible]. So it's pretty awesome to be part of this program, and you get a lot of skills related to a lot of different stuff. So there is some marketability in terms of the outcome of your academic abuse.

[ Laughter ]

But once you get through it, man, it really helps, and when I was a student, I mean, my history is I was in college to play football, but after NFL was over, I decided I needed higher education. So education has a different role other than to [inaudible] to the NFL, I started thinking what all to do in life, and [inaudible]. The Native country needed some attention. This was the perfect program for me, and it's really been a good thing for a lot of people that have come through these doors. I wish you well and good luck, and I'm glad that you're interested in working with people with disabilities. That's a great thing for us. You're all [inaudible]. Disability does not discriminate. So again, that's something where we want to have, overall, to [inaudible] more aware of this special interest, in terms of Indian country for me associated with disabilities, but also throughout society in the world. We're worldwide, so multi-nations throughout we work with, and we've worked with 85 tribal nations, as well. So it's a nice, diverse group. I like to see the diversity in it, as well. So I wish you well on your journey to higher education. Any questions? All right, good luck.

 

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>> And Kumar, would you like to say anything about your experiences in the program?

>> My name is Kumar Bradford. This is my second semester in the Rehabilitation Counseling Program. I'm kind of peculiar, because both my parents graduated from this program and are counselors themselves that specialize in drug and alcohol in the U.S. Navy, and I grew up in the environmental psychology, but I kind of went on my own path. I studied art and Japanese and [inaudible], but the more that I take classes, the more I come in with theories and the idea of rehabilitation and the idea the psychology of someone recovering from their own perceptions and perceptions outside of them. I find that having other skills that you bring to the table when it comes to counseling is really handy, because it's a very, I guess you could verbally intelligent field. People talk a lot. It's pretty much about words. The thing is, when you start to visualize concepts and you start to understand them in other ways that people learn and other intelligences, it's going to make you an even better counselor. So, like, I'm pretty excited about, like, what I can do with my skill set studying in this field, and I think if you come into this program and you apply what you know, your other studies, you can [inaudible].

 

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>> At this point, our alumni, our current students, if you guys want to take off or you're welcome to stay, we're going to get into applying for the program, and we'll talk about some of the different features of the different aspects of the program. So again, you know, this might be a time to kind of take a little bit of a break. You know, we have refreshments outside. Feel free to grab any on your way out, if you'd like to now. So again, we'll probably, let's take a minute or so. Then we'll transition to the next part of [inaudible]. But thank you guys for being here.

[ Background Discussion ]

That we talked about already tonight, and we'll go over some of the application procedures [inaudible]. All right, so first of all we talked about the fact that we have a on campus versus distance program. You might be kind wondering why would we have two versions of the program? How are they different? You know, do we do different things? And the bottom line is they're basically the same program. The same master's degree that's on your transcript if you graduate from a distance versus on-campus program. Both programs are 60 units. Both are accredited by the Council of Rehabilitation Education, which does accreditation for rehab counseling programs like ours [inaudible]. And actually, it's not two programs. It is one program offered through these two different systems, two different ways offer the content. What are you doing? Are you going to tape something.

>> [inaudible] lined up. Yeah, we can go.

>> Well, we kind of withdrew that part already, but that's all right. Yeah, this is the part we normally use for taping.

>> Oh.

 

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>> Yeah. The distance program is designed for people that are outside of the San Diego area. You know, so you can basically be anywhere throughout California, anywhere in the world, basically, as long as you have Internet connection, and the class is a really taught in her own schedule. The one exception to that is basically every week you have assignments that would be due. You have to make sure that you complete those assignments by those due dates. As long as you do that, you can do the work in the middle of the night. You could do this at Starbuck's. You could really do the work, whatever works for people's schedules. So sometimes we have people go through the distance program, number one, if they just live too far geographically to come to a department like ours, but also because of scheduling issues. They may not really have the opportunity to go through the program full-time on campus. Again, the bottom line is that you got to be outside the San Diego area. Now, the on-campus program is also 60 units. It's the same master's degree. There are some different features in the on campus versus distance program. So, you know, if you're kind of on the fence thinking do I want to go to the distance program or do I want to go to the on-campus program, one of the differences with the on-campus is we have different specializations that are not offered in the distance program. So some of our students and alumni talked about different specializations. That's one area. We have specializations where you would obtain a certificate in one of these different areas and really focus your professional training on one of those areas. You could attain a certificate from SDSU. It's not, like, where I go to my computer and type it out and give it to you. It's an officially recognized certificate. It's a certificate from SDSU, and you would do the work within the time within the program. It wouldn't extend the time in the program.

 

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It would still be the same 60 units, but you would focus some of the different courses on particular content areas. So as I mentioned before, I have one in cognitive disabilities. We have a program in psychiatric rehabilitation, and then we also have one in rehabilitation technology that Dr. Sacks coordinates. So again, for the distance versus on-campus is those certificate programs are not available in the distance program, but they are available in the on-campus program, and again, that's one of the reasons why some students decide to go to the on-campus versus the distance. The other thing that we don't have in the distance program that we do have on the on-campus is the possibility that you can be trained as a licensed professional counselor, and the way are doing that, preparing students for what's called the LPCC. It stands for the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor is that you would take a number of classes that would be different from other students in the master's degree program. You would obtain, you know, you would still have a master's degree in rehabilitation counseling, but some of the classes that we talked about tonight, like grant writing. There's some other classes that most students would take, but if you're in the clinical focus, you would take classes like preparing for, like, a pharmacology or the DSM or other things that are relevant specifically to clinical counseling. So what we try to do, when you come into the program, if you have that interest area, we would work with you right away to develop a program of study that would prepare you for that, because for pretty much from your first semester until the time you graduate, if you go the licensed professional clinical counselor route, it would change the classes you would take from semester to semester. So it's a decision you would want to make early on, and the faculty member who coordinates that is Dr. Marjorie Ulney. So she would be your advisor.

 

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She would guide you through the progression of going through the clinical classes, and again, that's an option. Certificate programs are an option. You know, not all students would do the licensed professional clinical counselor route. Not all students would do one of the certification routes, like in cognitive disabilities. Some students want to have a general type of education, and that's fine too, because in the final analysis, you know, you have the master's degree in rehabilitation counseling, and you're really qualified to work with a number of different populations. You're qualified to work in different professional settings, but the reasons why somebody might choose one of these kind of specialized routes is going into the program, you know, they know that they really want to learn more about one of those particular content areas, and sometimes when students make the choice of a certificate program, during the time in the program, they may not be ready for that or know that right away, but they choose that later on. Now back to these licensed professional clinical counselor option, that's a decision you would have to make your first semester in the program. You have to know that you want to do that right away, all right? And, you know, we talked about this kind of individualized type of support we provide.

 

>> Can I interrupt you? If you are interested in the LPCC focus, it is actually its own master's degree choice when you put in your application. So you need to go ahead and choose rehab counseling with a clinical concentration, okay, in rehabilitation. It's in, I think, actually, clinical rehabilitation.

>> That's a great point, yeah.

>> Both of them are master's degrees in rehab counseling, but the other one can get you a clinical focus, and it has a little bit different track and classes that you'll take. Sorry about that.

 

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>> No, great point. One of the things we put on our agenda is the possibility of stipends, RSA stipends, and that stands for the Rehabilitation Services Administration. It's part of the U.S. Department of Education, and they provide funding for students to obtain their master's degree in rehabilitation counseling with the idea that, you know, we really have a shortage of master's degree rehab counselors to work throughout the United States. So there's an incentive for the federal government to have students go through programs like ours, and what would happen if you did receive a stipend grant, and you know, it could be anywhere from $500, $600 per month, over the course of the academic year, and we have a number of different stipend programs, and they kind of have a different type of focus going into it. So back to the LPCC. If that was your focus, there is a stipend program that is specific to those students who want to have the type of focus to the department. I have a grant that focuses on students who are going into the California Department of Rehabilitation or other state VR agency. So if you know that that's your focus, you know, you'd be more eligible. You'd be more kind of aligned to receiving, you know, the funding from that grant, and let's say if you did receive a stipend from, you know, one of these RSA programs that we have, there's something somebody mentioned tonight, an employment payback. Meaning that for every year of support you would receive in stipends, you would have to work two years for either the California Department of Rehabilitation, another state's vocational rehabilitation agency, and every state has their own, the department of rehab. They're all called something different, or an agency that provides services to a state VR client, and when I use this term state VR, what that means, it stands for the state vocational, State/Federal Vocational Rehabilitation System.

 

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It's a partnership between states and the federal government to provide vocational support services to people with disabilities. So if you have, like, mental illness. If you have a brain injury. If you have an intellectual disability. It could be any kind of disability, you could go into one of the state VR agencies. In California we call this California Department of Rehabilitation. And request services to have the ultimate goal of getting into employment. You know, so that could mean they may pay for your college education. They may pay for job placement services. They may pay for different kinds of technologies that would help you achieve that long-term employment goal. So, you know, that, traditional in our field, in our profession, employment with state vocational rehabilitation has been one of the primary areas. So the stipend programs really are aligned to that in a lot of ways, but I think, as we talked about tonight, that's one of many potential areas you could go in the program. You could work at community colleges. You could work at nonprofit agencies and work with different people with disabilities. You could work for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and work with our veterans. There's so many different ways that you can utilize this degree that I think it's one of the attractive options about the field, and, you know, as our alumni talked about tonight, many of them have had different kinds of jobs in the field. They may work for a number of years in one area. They decide they want to go into a new area for their professional focus, and with this degree you have that kind of disability. I think that's one of the major draws of why people choose to go into this. And then the classes. Let's kind of get back to the on-campus program. A typical semester would look like, you're either going to have classes from 4 PM to 6:40 or 7 PM to 9:40. Classes are held one day per week, and there held on campus with the exception of Dr. Tucker's course, which is Medical Aspects of Disabilities course. You have two of those classes your first year of the program.

 

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That's held off campus at Sharp Rehabilitation. So you have classes Monday through Thursday, you know, one day per week, two and a half hours approximately, and, you know, the value of that is you can work during the day. You can do your clinical training during the day, and then 4 o'clock or 7 o'clock you come here and you take your classes. The classes are either in the fall and spring. We don't have classes in the summer. If you're in the distance program, there are summer classes, but in the on-campus program, it's only the fall and spring semester. And typically, it takes around 2-1/2 to 3 years to complete the program. So, you know, we talked about kind of intensity of the program. Like, Kelly, I know, we talked about this before, kind of balancing everything. Let's say we can say safely that it's not easy, but it is possible. And we've had students who have had a full-time course schedule, full-time or part-time employment. They've had babies are small children at home. You know, you find a way to do it, and, you know, we talked about the support would get from the program. You know, we would work with you on creating a schedule that would work for you. We've had some students start full time, and they go part time for a while. Maybe they need to take a semester off. You have that kind of flexibility to go in this program, and we try to really work with each student individually to figure out, you know, what is going to work best for you? What kind of support you need from us to help you get through the program. So you're not on your own. You know, you got people kind of in your corner all the time, encouraging you, trying to help you different aspects of the program.

 

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You know, and I think the people that make it through are those who are organized. Who have support from people at home. Who have a clear focus and a reason for why they want to be, you know, in this field, why they want to be in the program. So you can do it. Again, it's not easy but it's manageable, it's doable. So, you know, the last thing we wanted to talk about is the application procedures. And I wanted to make sure we had a chance to answer any questions you might have about different program features. I know we covered a lot of stuff. You've heard all the alumni, the current students. So any questions that you want to address right now, before we get into the application procedure?

 

>> I'm interested in the LPCC. You said you could do both. Like you said, because [inaudible].

>> Sure, yeah. So what you would finish the same amount of time, but the classes you would take would be different. There is a number of classes that are specific to the LPCC that other students who are not pursuing that wouldn't take. So that's why I was saying, like, when you apply to the program, one of the things you'll do when you apply is you write a statement of purpose, and you also have an interview with a faculty member.

 

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You would want to articulate in every kind of way that you could when you're, you know, applying to the program that you're interested in the LPCC option. So that if you're admitted to the program from day one, we would work with you on creating a program of study that would move toward that goal, and in the end, you have a master's degree. People that don't have the LPCC have a master's degrees. You both have master's degrees in rehabilitation counseling. You have a different focus, and you have the eligibility then to pursue a licensure as a counselor in California, but you have to go through that concentration. You know, one of the things, if you pick the LPCC option, and Dr. Ulney will speak further to you, you know, if you want to pursue that, and I would encourage you guys to talk to her directly, and I can give you her contact information we finish tonight. It's not only LPCC focus you have in the program when you finish. You have 3000 hours of post-graduate clinical supervision you have to do. You also have to take a number of different examinations to pass. See you really want to know that this is something you want to do. You wouldn't make the decision lightly to pursue the LPCC, and, you know, we always tell people you should pursue it if you have a clear professional goal for doing so. You know, some students come in knowing that they want to do psychotherapy, that they want to do clinical-based mental health counseling, and that's what they want to make the focus of their profession. Well, let's you come in and you know you want to be a vocational rehabilitation counselor with the VA or with the California Department of Rehabilitation. Or you want to work with students with disabilities in a college or university setting, it wouldn't make sense to pursue the LPCC because it doesn't really give you any advantage in terms of doing that employment. But there are other jobs in which licensure is really vital. So another, you know, reason for the LPCC would be if you want to work for the San Diego County of Mental Health. That's a position where you would have to be licensed to have that kind of job. So, you know, you really want to know a good reason for doing that, because it's a lot of time, a lot of energy to pursue that option.

 

 

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>> Okay, my objective [inaudible] counseling [inaudible] counselor with a specific goal to rehabilitation, which is known has being visually impaired, the blind. So can I obtain counseling and [inaudible]?

>> Well, I think, let's say, if you wanted to be rehabilitation counselor in that area, you wouldn't have to have the LPCC. Probably, you know, when we talk about individualizing the training, we would work with you, especially when you get to the point of doing internships in the program, and every student does around 600 hours of applied work in the field. So one example would be we have San Diego Center for the Blind, where we've had a number of students do their training. Another location would be Blind Field Services, which is part of the California Department of Rehabilitation. We would make sure that your training would be in that area. So at the time you finished the program, you would have applied experience in that area. You would have expertise on how to provide rehabilitation counseling to that population, and that's what you would want to do in terms of individualizing the training. Now, if you had a clear rationale why licensing would help you pursue that goal, you know, there might be a reason for that. But I think, you know, that's something for your faculty advisor would work with you, making sure that that's the right decision for what you want to do. Yeah?

 

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>> With that program you have to make that decision prior to --

>> Well, when you first start the program, you've got to make that decision. Your first semester.

>> Good, but when she said to apply.

>> Then this will get into our application procedures. Let's shift to that. When you apply to the program, there's two applications you're going to do. One is to what's called CSU Mentor. That gets students through the California State University system, and the deadline for this, and you want to underscore this, write this down, put it in bold is March 2, 2015, for the on campus program. Distance program is August 1.

[ Inaudible Speech ]

>> Mentor. Mark, can you put that on the screen.

>> I was just going to say, I'll put it up here.

>> Yeah.

>> Did you want to call it up on --

>> Yeah, if you could put on this overhead here --

>> That's CSU for California State University mentor at the University.

 

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>> When you got through CSU Mentor, you have to pick the major that you're pursuing, and the LPCC has an entry, I believe, let me get the exact language here. It's going to make reference to the LPCC focus, and if you don't have that focus, it's going to say rehabilitation counseling. So let me get this to make sure. I'll give you the right language. So it's going to say rehabilitation counseling, clinical rehabilitation. That's going to be the choice you would make for the LPCC. And again, I would encourage you, if you're thinking about it strongly or kind of, you know, contact Dr. Ulney either way, because she's the expert on this process, and I would want to make sure you have the right information if you're going to pursue that option. Yeah, so this is what CSU Mentor is going look like, and there's two things you're going to do with that CSU mentor. That March 2nd deadline is to get your name and contact information into the system, and you're going to pay a $55 application fee, and that's all due by March 2nd. Now you have until April 1st to upload transcripts from any kind of post-secondary experience you might have had. If you have anything from community college, bachelor's programs, other graduate programs, that all gets uploaded into CSU Mentor, and the other thing you upload as GRE scores, That's Graduate Record Examination scores, and those are all due April 1st. now I would encourage you to get all your application materials in as soon as you can. You don't have to wait until the deadlines because as soon as we have your materials, we can interview you, and if we feel like you're a good fit for the program, we can admit you at that point. You know, so there's no need to delay if you feel you're ready to pursue the application. So that's the first one. Mark, can you get to the Apply Now website?

 

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>> On the Mentor?

>> No, go to SCSU College Education, and I can show you a little bit of -- and in your approval letter, and we've got extra copies of it here. Did Lisa give you all a copy of the letter? Or do you guys have -- it's a letter that says "Dear Potential Student"? So that's going to make reference to on page two right where it says in bold "Monthly stipends are available to qualified students." Actually, no, on the top of the page, it's going to have this website that says http coe SCSU, admissions, apply now. When you click on that website, it gives you links to the CSU Mentor website and also to this thing called the Apply Now website. The Apply Now website is where you apply to the department. And on the college of education website, this is referred to as a supplementary program application. Now the old days, we used to do everything my paper. You'd have to be sending these recommendation letters and your statement of purpose, and we would have just a ton of paper we're trying to organize, but now it's all done electronically through these systems. Through CSU Mentor and through this supplementary program application. Now in that application, it's done through CSU Mentor, and you upload a number of things. You upload a resume. You upload a statement of purpose which are your reasons for wanting to apply to this program and pursue a career in rehabilitation counseling, and then you also list three people to write letters of recommendation on your behalf. When you list those individuals, you give them your name, and you know, you give the system their names and their email addresses, and then the system will contact your letter writers, and they're going to ask the letter writer to upload a letter of recommendation on your behalf. So you're never going to actually be handling any letters and sending them into us. The letter writers are going to be contacted automatically through the system, based on what you put into that. And, you know, in terms of letter writers, we like at least one from a professor who can talk about your ability to do graduate-level work. So think about people whom you've had some kind of relationship with. They know your work. Maybe talk to them about your career interests. They can see your ability to do well on academic tasks like writing, exams, things like that. So I think you have, like, one, that's helpful. You know, you might be in a situation may be where it's been a lot of years since you've been in school.

 

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Maybe that's not possible, but if it is possible, I think it's helpful to have that. The other good letter writers are people who can attest to your abilities to do work related to this field. So maybe you've done volunteer work. Maybe you've done a direct service work in the field. Maybe you have some kind of job that in some way relates to rehabilitation counseling. Supervisors of you in those positions are good people to write letters of recommendation. You know, because they can attest to your clinical abilities, your ability to counsel people, your ability to, you know, really do this kind of job. Now we would recommend, not to have, like, friends or family members. We've had that before, and obviously, you know, we're going to think that they're probably biased. I mean, maybe not going to be totally honest in what they're saying. But I think, you know, having supervisors and professors are good people to look at, you know, for these letters. So with this application, the second very important application, everything is due April 1st, but, you know, we would recommend you work on that sooner than that. Sometimes, like, letters take a while for people to do them. That's one example. And then, you know, as we talked about before, if you have your materials in, you know, we can interview you at that point. We already have a couple of interviews lined up because the applicants have gotten all their materials in. So, you know, the sooner the better, you know, is recommended. Yeah, Kelly.

 

>> So with letters of recommendation, it literally a letter [inaudible]?

>> Yeah, sometimes programs have that, but it's just a letter. Yeah, yeah.

>> What about if they can't do the letter? They don't?

 

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>> Yeah, you have to go back to them and tell them to upload it. I've had students or some letter writers, where they had trouble figuring the system out, and, you know, interview exceptions, I've had letter writers email me the letter, but we really don't want that. You know, we want them to go to the system, and part of that is, you know, when we review your files, you know, Lisa's going to be looking at them. I'll be looking at them. Mark will be looking at them, Karen, you know, and it goes to, like, one central place. So having letters uploaded allows everyone who's going to look at your file to have access to that. Yeah, you never would be dealing with letters yourself. The one thing you may have to do from time to time is send reminders out to your letter writer, and I think, like, when you ask them to write letters, you know, would be pretty firm on, like, when you need those letters uploaded. The people forget about it, and, you know, people get busy. So, you know, that's something you have to do from time to time.

>> I think with supplemental applications, also, we'll email [inaudible] whoever you put in there automatically if something hasn't been received or within a certain time period, I'd have to ask Sandy what that time period is, but she has told me that it does send out reminders that you have a letter [inaudible] to that person that you're looking to get from. So if you see that it's not there, and you haven't yet had a chance to send email, it will send an email, but [inaudible] as well. We don't want you to feel like you're bothering the person, but yeah, you know, it's really an important part of your interview process.

>> As for the statement of purpose, what are the case links guidelines and like, I don't know, just some schools are very particular about how it looks and how long it is.

>> So pretty flexible on that. You know, I think there's no particular length. I think, typically, people have, like, three, three pages maybe. You know, three or four pages. You know, it's enough for that we get a feel for why is it that you want to pursue this degree and this profession.

 

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You know, so don't feel like, let's say, on the far end, you don't have to write something 10 pages or 20 pages, but you also wouldn't want to have something like a paragraph or a page or something. You know, something where you have really a chance to explain who you are, and, again, your rationale because one of the things we talk a lot about in this profession is fit, and, you know, talking about, like, how people with disabilities may fit into a certain profession, you know, certain kind of choices they make, and it's the same thing with you is applicant. We want to see if this is the right fit for you as a potential student and graduate of the program? You know, we've had students come in who have a stellar academic records, high GRE scores, high, you know, 4.0 GPAs, but they don't really have the ability to do the work. You know, we can't really see them in a counselor role with another individual, and we may not see why they want to do this degree. So, I think, you know, you want to carefully think about rationale for that, and, you know, it's really up to you as far as how you want to explain that. People talked about personal experiences, and members. They talked about jobs that they've had. They talk about the goals that they have, things that they want to do with their careers. It's really up to you, you know, in terms of how you want to articulate that vision for what it is you want to, and then, like, Mark, myself, Karen, Dr. Ulney, Dr. Hampton, we'll interview then, one on one, and then we'll have a chance to further talk about things you talked about in your statement of purpose, and then we have a range of questions that we ask the applicants to really get to know you and figure out, you know, who are you as a person and is this really the right direction for you to go? Mark, anything that you'd add. We've still got a couple minutes left.

 

 

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>> About?

>> The application, anything about the program, anything else, and Karen and Lisa, anything? Any concluding?

>> I think when thinking about running the statement, that's also a good chance for us to see how you write, and so, pay attention to that. You know, if you turn something in and it's full typos, and you don't have complete sentences, that's not going to tell us that you're ready for graduate school. There's a lot of expectations around writing and graduate school, and even though, Paul mentioned the GRE score, there's not a lot of research correlates if you did really well on the GRE test that you're going to be really good counselor. In fact, we've seen some of the opposite sometimes. You know, you can have really good grades at the GRE. That doesn't mean you know how to talk to people. So even though our field, really, we're more interested in her interpersonal skills and your ability to connect to people and listen to people, but you also have to do the academic work and show us that you know how to write professionally.

 

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You know, in your careers, you're going to all have to write case notes. You're going to have to write, you know, communication to individuals, to families, to your bosses, to who knows how far up the chain. So, you know, part of our job is to make sure you can really express yourself in writing, and that that's the caliber that's going to be professional, and we're going to help you work on that all through the program, but if we see that it's, you know, if you're turning in something and for your statement, and it's not very good, we're probably going to advise you to either go take some writing classes or get some support. There's a writing center on campus. So it doesn't mean that you, you know, it doesn't necessarily mean that you're not going to be admitted, but it's going to be a big, red flag for us. So think about that, and pay attention to that.

 

>> Yeah, the personal statement, I feel like, you know, if you can articulate a little bit about why the program important to you, maybe where you see yourself going, what you to get, what you hope to get out of it, was of the potential things that I really like to see when I'm looking at one of the personal statements, because the kind of helped us to understand, you know, who you are a little bit and where you see yourself going.

 

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>> Lisa, a concluding statement?

>> No, just make sure that you contact me if you're having troubles. We don't want to miss any deadlines. Unfortunately, a lot of times, you know, graduate admission is very hard with the deadlines. So we don't want any of you guys to miss your opportunity. So definitely reach out to me, so I can make sure that you're on track to put that in on time, and I think that's the most important thing just because, you know, lots of times, in the graduate division, we would love to be more flexible, but, you know, they do have set deadlines, and so we've push the envelope as far as we can as extending time for you guys, and so, I just don't want to see anyone missed their opportunity because they didn't get their applications submitted in time, okay?

>> You know, that really concludes our meeting. I will be following up with everyone on our roster, you know, to give you my information. If you ever want to meet individually. Anything, you know, that we talked about today, that you want to call up and discuss further, I'm available. The rest of us are available, as well, to meet with you and answer any questions you might have in the course of you guys as you go through the application process. But we really appreciate you guys spending your Friday night with us, Friday evening, and you know, I hope it was helpful, and we look forward to receiving your application, and that's it. So have a great weekend.

>> Thank you.

>> Thank you.

[ Applause ]

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